Posts Tagged ‘Ratio 3’

Geof Oppenheimer: Monsters at Ratio 3

Geof Oppenheimer. The Embarrassing Statue, 2014; electroplated steel, Husqvarna 150BT, marble, Brooks Brothers pants, plaster bandages, and MDF; 101 x 33 x 33 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you author Danica Willard Sachs‘ review of Geof Oppenheimer‘s Monsters at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. This article was originally published on June 18, 2014.   Geof Oppenheimer’s current solo exhibition at Ratio 3, Monsters, continues his investigation of the physical markers of violence. In previous exhibitions, such as Inside Us All There Is a Part That Would Like to[.....]

Ryan McGinley: YEARBOOK at Ratio 3

Ryan McGinley. YEARBOOK, Installation view, Courtesy the artist and Ratio 3.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses (250–400 words) to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danica Willard Sachs reviews Ryan McGinley’s YEARBOOK at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. For his latest project, YEARBOOK (2013), Ryan McGinley has wallpapered the interior of Ratio 3 from[.....]

Ara Peterson: Wavepacks at Ratio 3

Ara Peterson. Untitled, 2013; wood and acrylic paint, 40 x 68 x 4 inches.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses (250–400 words) to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Grace Momota reviews Ara Peterson’s Wavepacks at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. While walking the most congested streets of the Mission District, one would never think to find a[.....]

Lutz Bacher at Ratio 3

LBacher-Installation-Ratio3_2012-11

  With Lutz Bacher‘s exhibition, San Francisco’s Ratio 3 creates a stark contrast to the surrounding neighborhood. Once the gallery’s heavy black doors close behind you, the vivid colors of Mission Street are abruptly shut off. The jagged, cavernous space is given over to stark black and white, or, to be more precise, irregular spatters of black on a white or light grey surface. The first thing one notices are small[.....]

The Part That Would Like to Burn Down Our Own House

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Recently in the San Francisco Bay Area it has been impossible to walk down a street without running into (or trying to avoid) someone protesting something. The messages range from concise to ironic, sardonic to flat-out fed up. In the undulating sea of abridged manifestos, there is the rare message so poignant that it demands the sign-bearer’s cause receives deeper consideration. Geoff Oppenheimer’s current exhibit[.....]

Get Your Ass To Mars: Takeshi Murata at Ratio 3

The title for Takeshi Murata’s current show—Get Your Ass To Mars—is a command, stolen from Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Hauser/Quaid character in Total Recall, based on Philip K. Dick’s “We Can Remember It For You Wholesale.” For the Hauser/Quaid character, what awaits him on Mars is textbook Dick: a conspiracy based on money and greed; instability in memory and identity, or in discerning reality; plus our own[.....]

They Knew What They Wanted

This year, there has been a laundry list of artist curated group shows, from David Salle’s exhibition, Your History is not our History, at Haunch of Venison, to Jeff Koon’s Skin Fruit at the New Museum and the upcoming Walead Beshty curated show, Picture Industry (Goodbye to All That), at Regen Projects. Each exhibition has its hits and misses in terms of content, style and[.....]