Posts Tagged ‘representation’

From the Archives – Black Chronicles II at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Peter Jackson aka ‘The Black Prince’. London Stereoscopic Company, 2 December 1889. 42.5 x 31.5”. Framed & Unglazed. Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

“New struggles for civil and race rights continue to challenge and mine the unequal fields of representation within American political life.” So writes author Jordan Amirkhani, who explored this exhibition earlier in 2016, and connected these studio portraits from the late 1800s to current images from the Black Lives Matter movement. Today from our archives we consider Black visibility in culture and history. This article was originally published on May[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

Letter from the Executive Director: Living the Art World We Make

Christopher Paul Jordan and Jaleesa Trapp. Art Hack Seattle project, 2016; installation view, Velocity:V2. Courtesy of the Artists.

Since I took on the role of Executive Director of Daily Serving and Art Practical, working with an administrative staff of four fierce, intersectional, women-identified cultural producers, I have been asked to think and rethink what it means to work. Whom do we work for? What is our work, and most importantly, what world does it create? In the past month, I have witnessed the[…..]

Alina Szapocznikow: Human Landscape(s) at Galerie Loevenbruck

Alina Szapocznikow. Paysage humain (du cycle «Paysages humains») [Human Landscape] (from the
Cycle «Human Landscape»), 1971;
Felt-tip pen and watercolor on cardboard; 11 13/16 x 19 3/16 in. Courtesy The Estate of Alina Szapocznikow / Piotr Stanislawski / Galerie
Loevenbruck, Paris.
© ADAGP, Paris. Photo: Fabrice Gousset.

Owing to the success of her figurative work as well as her 2012 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Polish artist Alina Szapocznikow is widely recognized for her uncanny mixed-media sculptures that incorporate cast body parts with everyday objects. Often overlooked, however, are her drawings of abstracted figures—erotic, restless, and vulnerable—though they are a central part of her practice. Human Landscape(s)[…..]

Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Adam Pendleton. Installation Shot of System of Display, X (EXPRESS/Poro secret society mask, Mano, Liberia). 2016. Silkscreen ink on Plexiglas and mirror. Image courtesy of the artist and the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans.

Curated by Dr. Andrea Andersson, Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible is the most extensive museum presentation of the artist’s work to date—a significant triumph for a cultural institution located in New Orleans, one of the most racially and politically fraught cities in the southern United States. While the exhibition’s rich display resonates with the variety of material and conceptual strategies at work in Pendleton’s oeuvre, it[…..]

Black Chronicles II at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Unidentified Sitter. Edinburgh, c. 1900. Photographer/Studio: Alex Ayton Junior. Carte-de-visite, 64 x 100 mm. Courtesy of Val Wilmer Collection.

Born on the Danish island colony of Saint Croix with two generations of slaves behind him, the champion heavyweight boxer Peter Jackson cuts a lean and noble figure in his 1889 photographic portrait, his top hat perched level upon his head, his elegant Victorian garments pressed, his stylish accoutrements placed as evidence of his social persona as a gentleman–dandy. The portrait was taken just a[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]