Posts Tagged ‘Revolution’

Best of 2015 – Jennifer Moon, Jemima Wyman, and Robby Herbst at Commonwealth & Council

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Radical Openness, 2015; Bronze; 20 x 19 x 9 in.; Unique edition of 3 + 1 A.P. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Power, 2015; DIY fabric-prints on cotton poplin, painted steel rods; Site-specific installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts criticism. Today’s selection comes from the editor in chief of our sister publication, Art Practical: Kara Q. Smith opines, “It’s not easy to write about three shows in 1,000 words, but what I love about this review by Matt Stromberg is his ability to nod to the [California] art history that[…..]

Jennifer Moon, Jemima Wyman, and Robby Herbst at Commonwealth & Council

Jennifer Moon. 3CE: A Relational Love Odyssey, 2015; HD Video (TRT: 11:15); edition of 3 + 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

As contemporary art seems to be increasingly the province of the 1%, with continual record-breaking auctions, it may be difficult to appreciate the revolutionary origins of modernism. Early 20th-century art movements like Constructivism, Futurism, and Dada sought an aesthetic, social, and political break with the past, often with utopian goals for the future. A trio of solo shows at Commonwealth & Council aim to reinvigorate[…..]

Summer Reading – No one cares about art criticism: advocating for an embodiment of the avant-garde as an alternative to capitalism

Jenny Holzer. You are a victim of the rules you live by, n.d.

Today we continue our Summer Reading series with an essay on art criticism and poetry from our friends at Temporary Art Review. Author Steven Cottingham throws down a challenge: “How can art criticism be so close to art but fail to reflect any of its spirit? […] Maybe there is a future where art criticism is no longer a supplementary, reactionary activity. Maybe it can become revolutionary.”[…..]

Remnants of Revolution: Writing on the Wall in Barcelona

Cities are filled with innumerable details and a foreign land can be barrage of data. In Barcelona, on a walk, I drift from details of leafy building ornamentation to blank walls of flaking stucco, submerged in texture of all kinds. Man’s signs are everywhere, waiting to be decoded. Though I know nothing of graffiti, I am captivated by the drawing, the view of a flat[…..]