Posts Tagged ‘Rob Marks’

Sequence’s Travels Into Several Notions of the Museum

Richard Serra. Sequence, 2006; weatherproof steel; 153 x 488 x 782 3/17 in. overall and 2 in. thick; installation views at New York MoMA (top left) Photo: Lorenz Kienzle, collection of the artist, © 2007 Richard Serra / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, LACMA (top right) Courtesy of the Artist, the Cantor Arts Center (bottom left) Photo: Saul Rosenfield, © 2014–15, with permission of Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, and SFMOMA’s 85-foot wide by 55-foot long Howard Street gallery (bottom right) Photo: Henrik Kem © 2015.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an excerpt from Rob Marks’ consideration of Richard Serra’s Sequence, recently moved from the Cantor Arts Center to SFMOMA. Marks notes, “Sequence is massive, particularly when seen from afar. But it becomes something completely different up close.[…] For Jonathan Swift, too, size stood as much for difference as it did for power. The Lilliputians start by seeing[…..]

Terry Berlier: Erased Loop Random Walk at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art

Terry Berlier. Core Sampling (Tick Tock), 2009 (detail); FGR-95, dyes, steel, motors, MAKE Controller, computer, sensor, microscope camera, PVC, aluminum, pocket watch, and MAX. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: David Pace.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Rob Marks‘ review of Erased Loop Random Walk, a solo exhibition of works by Terry Berlier now on view at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art. As Marks sees it, “Any despair over impending catastrophic environmental change evoked by [the work]…is balanced by a full-out sense of wonder and possibility.” This article was originally published on January 14,[…..]

Anoka Faruqee: Substance and Accident at Hosfelt Gallery

Anoka Faruqee. 2013P-34, 2013; acrylic on linen on panel; 33.75 x 33.75 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Anoka Faruqee‘s paintings at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Author Rob Marks notes that critics of Op art who characterize the genre as superficial are ignoring the possibilities that lie beneath the surface: “Faruqee’s 2013P-29, 2013P-32, and 2013P-34 (all 2013), for example, could appear as little more than decoration, gimmickry, or novelty…. But such easily drawn conclusions—the[…..]

Best of 2012 – #museumpractices: The Museum on My Mind

As we continue the Best of 2012 edition, Marilyn Goh, DailyServing’s Editor for the Asia / Pacific region, has selected Rob Mark‘s series The Museum on My Mind. As a part of #Hashtags, the bi-weekly series on art and politics, Rob wrote a four part article engaging museum practices. Marilyn stated, “If I have to choose something that I particularly enjoyed reading about this year, it would[…..]

#museumpractices: The Museum on My Mind, Part I

John Cage, HV2 25B, 1992; one in a series of 25 aquatints; 12 x 14 inches; published by Crown Point Press, San Francisco. Courtesy of Crown Point Press.

#Hashtags provides a platform for longer reconsiderations of artworks and art practices outside of the review format and in new contexts. Today #Hashtags kicks off a new series on the institution of the museum, by writer Rob Marks. Stay tuned for Part II, and please send queries and/or ideas for future columns to Part I: If the Walls Would Not Speak The museum is[…..]

Recovering Site and Mind: Richard Serra’s Sequence Arrives at Stanford

Landmarks of the Cantor Arts Center do little to orient the participant walking through Richard Serra’s “Sequence,” on loan from the Fisher Art Foundation. Photos: Saul Rosenfield, © 2011, with permission of Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University

The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University is engaged in a dangerous experiment, and it is not the levitation of a twenty-ton piece of Richard Serra’s steel sculpture, Sequence, 2006, thirty feet into the air. Nor is it the gyration of a 200-foot tall crane lifting the first of twelve panels—each almost thirteen-feet high and between thirty- and forty-feet long—from a flatbed trailer onto a[…..]