Posts Tagged ‘Robert Heinecken’

Summer Reading: The Influentially Lewd Allure of Robert Heinecken

Robert Heinecken. Recto/Verso #2, 1988; 
Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Clark Winter Fund.

As the editors of Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts[.....]

Best of 2013 – Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

For today’s installment of our Best of 2013 series, we have a selection from co-founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “Robert Heinecken has always lived near the top of my favorites list. So, reading this lovely review of his recent project in LA was a nice little surprise. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on how Heinecken’s work operates in today’s context—shedding light on how[.....]

Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

Robert Heinecken, Misc...Newswoman (Blue), 1984; Dye bleach print videograms, plexiglas frame; 1 of 5-part; 11 x 14 inches each, 27.94 x 35.56 cm each. Courtesy of Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

Robert Heinecken is an artist who is hard to pin down. A photographer who rarely used a camera, he founded UCLA’s photography department in 1964. Skeptical of the documentarian role of photography, he mined images from mass media, prefiguring the appropriation strategies of Pictures Generation artists like Richard Prince and Sherrie Levine by at least a decade. Despite this, he was never able to achieve[.....]

Experimental Photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery

Robert Heinecken. From the portfolio Recto/Verso, 1989; Cibachrome (dye destruction) photogram; 11 x 14 in. Image courtesy of Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Robert Heinecken and Edmund Teske’s work in experimental photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery. Author Genevieve Quick analyzes the artists’ use of appropriation and their take on gender and mass media. She notes, “…there’s always more to the message than what’s on display.” This article was originally published in May 2012. Robert[.....]