Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

Hashtags: Crossing the Lines

Breezeway, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, 2016, with installation view: Shinique Smith, 
Forgiving Strands, 
2015 – 2016. Image courtesy the artist and  Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joshua Targownik / targophoto.com

#capitalism #markets #institutions #gentrification #innovation Two recent unconventional gallery openings on the West Coast have upended expectations about how the commercial and nonprofit sectors of the art world correspond to and interact with one another. Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s seven-building complex in Los Angeles’ downtown arts district is a commercial gallery with institutional ambitions, promising thematic exhibitions, high-profile loans, publishing, and scholarship. Minnesota Street Project,[…..]

Prima Materia at Weinstein Gallery

Enrico Donati. Aleppo Walls, 1960; mixed media on canvas; 60 x 60 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Enrico Donati and the Weinstein Gallery, San Francisco. Photo: Nicholas Pishvanov.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Garrett Caples reviews Prima Materia at Weinstein Gallery in San Francisco. To celebrate a recent monograph written by Dawn Ades, the Weinstein Gallery has mounted an ambitious show—in[…..]

Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle. The Sower, 2015; India ink, acrylic paint, and polyfilm on wood panel; 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery and the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Matthew Harrison Tedford’s review of Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. The author notes, “[…] I came to see the entire exhibition as Kentifrica—not just an imaginary place, but a dream, a revision, or a projection of a continent that could have been or[…..]

David Ireland at Walter and McBean Galleries

David Ireland. David Ireland, 2016; installation view, Walter and McBean Galleries, San Francisco Art Institute. Courtesy of San Francisco Art Institute. Photo: Gregory Goode.

Wry humor, mystery, and entropy: Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Danica Willard Sachs’ review of David Ireland’s work at the Walter and McBean Galleries at the San Francisco Art Institute. The author notes, “Throughout, Ireland draws our attention repeatedly to the material conditions of each object, the where and how of every action, rooting them in real time and space.” This article was[…..]

Metahaven: The Sprawl at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Metahaven. The Sprawl (still), 2015. Co-produced by Lighthouse and commissioned by Lighthouse and the Space.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Anton Stuebner’s review of Metahaven: The Sprawl at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. The author notes, “[…] Metahaven poetically suggests that trauma’s real origins aren’t found in the images on screen—they’re located within ourselves and in our inherent capacity for perpetuating violence in the world around us.” This article was originally published on February 2, 2016. A[…..]

Chris Johanson: Equations at Altman Siegel

Given the cartoonlike basis of most of his portrayals, the slackerly compositions, and the seeming arbitrariness of the surface textures of the paint he uses so dynamically as a set of color choices (seemingly clumsy elements that have often been similarly deployed by other artists who might pass as “outsider,” however relative that term might be), the question arises as to why Johanson chooses to so often paint rather than draw. In these pieces Johanson doubles down on painting in several ways: first, through the large scale of several of the scenes, as with Lecture Series/Abstract Mass, and the bleak consumer composite suburbia of Los Angeles with Pills. Johanson paints on repurposed wood panels and displays most of his work in awkward, large, built wooden armatures to show off both fronts and backs equally (as he has done even more elaborately in installations elsewhere). This prominently shows off the wooden buttressing behind the panels, which he also highlights with “secondary” paintings on the reverse. These include what look like a series of painted geometric doodles mosaic’d on the back of one larger composition, a simple set of color fields of darker and lighter brown parceled out by the different wood elements themselves, and what looks like a beginning painted sketch of an abstract landscape not so dissimilar to what might show up elsewhere as just one among many background components in a “primary” or finished painting by Johanson on the front of one of his panels.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Equations at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Johanson eschews in this set of paintings the strategy of inserting text directly into the worlds he creates. The titles of the pieces do some of that work.” This article was originally published on November 30, 2015. In this exhibition of ten new works (all[…..]

Julian Hoeber: The Inward Turn at Jessica Silverman Gallery

Julian Hoeber. The Inward Turn; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

In this closed, infinite system, there is more to ponder than the paradoxical experience of such a visual journey.