Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum

Zhang Huan. To Raise the Water Level in a Fishpond, 1997; chromogenic print on Fuji archival paper; 40 ¾ in x 60 ½ in. Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami. © Zhang Huan.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of 28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Author Jing Cao notes: “The best works in 28 Chinese take as their subject [a] tension between material conditions and ideological constructs—between things and meanings—to offer new ways of observing the contemporary condition.” This article was originally published on June 25, 2015. 28 Chinese at the Asian[…..]

What Matters to Us?: A Reenactment of Anna Halprin’s Blank Placard Dance

What Matters to Us?: A Reenactment of Anna Halprin’s Blank Placard Dance, Saturday, May 16, 2015, San Francisco. Photo: Emily Holmes.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of What Matters to Us?, performed in San Francisco on May 16, 2015. Of her participation in the event, author Vanessa Kauffman notes, “The act of protest alone had absolved us of nothing. What matters to us is still out there, waiting.” This article was originally published on June 11, 2015.  Emerging one by one from the[…..]

Richard Misrach: Being(s) 1975–2015 at Fraenkel Gallery

Richard Misrach. Kodak, Donna, Debra, Jake, Oregon Coast, 1984; pigment print; 61 1/2 x 76 1/2 in. © Richard Misrach. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Richard Misrach: Being(s) 1975–2015 at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. Karl notes: “Misrach’s technical and compositional treatments produce a distancing effect that imbues the human figures with a kind of impotence.” This article was originally published on May 19, 2015. This Fraenkel Gallery survey of more than thirty years of Richard Misrach’s photography primarily[…..]

Eleanor Oakes at Tyler Wood Gallery

Eleanor Oakes. Panchromatic 1, 2015; silver gelatin print; 8 x 10 in. (matted); edition of 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy of the Artist and Tyler Wood Gallery.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Eleanor Oakes’ solo exhibition at Tyler Wood Gallery in San Francisco. Author Anton Stuebner notes: “In aestheticizing the random distortions effected onto this film stock, Oakes shows how time marks material substances with a distinctive presence.” This article was originally published on May 14, 2015. Our bodies leave behind innumerable traces: dead skin, soil,[…..]

Gwenaël Rattke: Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery

Gwenaël Rattke: NOT FUN AND NOT FREE installation view. Courtesy of Romer Young Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danica Willard Sachs reviews Gwenaël Rattke’s Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco. Gwenaël Rattke’s exhibition Not[…..]

Miriam Böhm: At On at Ratio 3

Miriam Böhm. Equally III, 2015; chromogenic print; 23 x 29 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Miriam Böhm’s current solo show at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs notes that the work has “a surreal dimensionality, with lines and planes that intersect in unusual ways, suggesting a simultaneous depth and flatness that refuses to resolve neatly into one or the other.” This article was originally published on April 14,[…..]

Fan Mail: Paul Taylor

Paul Taylor. SORRY, 2015; wood, steel, paint, hardware; 24 x 43 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist.

At the risk of having his artwork go unrecognized, Paul Taylor creates subtle interventions in land- and cityscapes. His works simultaneously embody and critique the influence of the quotidian. To achieve such interventions, Taylor works with an array of media: film, video, concrete, ink, graphite, plants, and found industrial and construction material. Much of Taylor’s work appears as though he simply found a perfect organization[…..]