Posts Tagged ‘Savannah’

State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now at the Jepson Center

Sheila Gallagher. Plastic Lila, 2013; melted plastic on armature; 81 × 64 1/2 in. Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Photo: Stewart Clements Photography.

The contemporary-art business is frequently portrayed as a cosmopolitan endeavor. The centers of the art world typically are cities where people buy expensive art, and easily consumable forms—like oil-on-canvas paintings—are usually favored by collectors and dealers. The exhibition State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now, presented by the Jepson Center at the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, explores artistic activity throughout the country; with[…..]

Manjunath Kamath: As Far As I Know at the SCAD Museum of Art

Manjunath Kamath. As Far As I Know, 2015; installation view, Savanna College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the SCAD Museum of Art.

The humorous pathos in the work is readily apparent, from the rabbits’ curiosity exposing them to deadly exhaust to a car dying and ascending to heaven.

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s at the Telfair Museums

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s, 2015; installation view, Jepson Center for the Arts, Telfair Museums, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of Telfair Museums. Photo: David J. Kaminsky.

Finally, here is an exhibition for which an accompanying Spotify playlist seems perfectly natural. Songs like “Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana and “Vogue” by Madonna are closely connected to the not-so-recent decade that the Telfair Museums represents through works of art in Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s. Curated by Alexandra Schwartz with Kimberly Sino (both of the Montclair Art Museum, where[…..]

Linear Abstraction at the SCAD Museum of Art

Phillip Stearns. Linear Abstraction, 2015; installation view. Gutstein Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Photo: Marc Newton.

Abstraction is dead! Long live abstraction! In Linear Abstraction, the SCAD Museum of Art negotiates the status of nonrepresentational work as it exists in the 21st century and includes work in various media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and digital formats. While the exhibition seeks to trace commonalities between contemporary practices by engaging somewhat diverse uses or ideas of lines, the resulting effect points succinctly to[…..]

GIF Studio at the Jepson Center

Nicolas Sassoon. Studio Visit, 2014 (still, detail). Looping GIF. Courtesy of Telfair Museums, Savannah, Georgia.

Within the Jepson Center of the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, there is a hallway that connects the main atrium to an auditorium, an education center, a small technology gallery, and the restrooms. This hallway gets a significant amount of foot traffic, but it does not provide optimal conditions for exhibiting traditional artwork. However, six flat-screen TVs, a digital projector, and an iPad are currently[…..]

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists, installation view, SCAD Museum of Art. Franck Abd-Bakar Fanny, Another Day without You, 2013; five c-prints mounted on disec; 39 ½ x 70 ¾ inches each. Ghada Amer, The Blue Bra Girls, 2012; stainless steel; 72 x 62 ¼ x 54 inches. Lamia Naji, Immaculé, 2011; six c-prints mounted on Dibond; 45 ¼ x 61 inches each. Courtesy of SCAD Museum of Art, photo by Marc Newton.

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, is an ambitious show, but originally I pondered the reason for viewing the work of African artists through a lens of an archetype of Western literature, The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri. While such an endeavor may not seem particularly edifying at the outset,[…..]

From the Archives: Diana Al-Hadid

Today in From the DS Archives, we bring you a review by Seth Curcio on the work of Diana Al-Hadid. Al-Hadid makes large-scale, mixed-media sculptures, and she currently has a solo exhibition at the Savannah College of Art and Design Museum in Savannah, Georgia. This article was originally published on November 19, 2007. Stepping into the Perry Rubenstein Gallery in New York City is a little like[…..]