Posts Tagged ‘Sculpture’

Summer Reading: Phyllida Barlow & Vincent Fecteau

Vincent Fecteau. Untitled, 2008; Papier-mâché, acrylic paint; 25 3/4 x 32 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Copyright Vincent Fecteau. Image courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery.

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[.....]

Fan Mail: Kristine Schomaker

Kristine Schomaker. History of composition and red, 2014; acrylic on board; 48 x 24 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Digital and analog technologies are seemingly at odds, with the digital on the verge of subsuming and overtaking the analog. The work of artist Kristine Schomaker, however, attempts in strikingly direct fashion to bridge the increasingly complex space between these two poles while acknowledging a deep-seated fascination with both. Schomaker uses digital graphics and animations to make objects, images, and avatars. These works stand as[.....]

Isabel Nolan: The Weakened Eye of Day at the Irish Museum of Modern Art

Isabel Nolan. The weakened eye of day, 2014; installation view, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin. Courtesy of the CCA Wattis Institute. Photo: © Denis Mortell

Boldly and optimistically, a viewer might enter Isabel Nolan’s exhibition The Weakened Eye of Day with bright, wondering eyes. In Room 1, just on the right, is Dreams of No Thing, No Time (2014), a small green-and-orange watercolor painting of a subject that likely looks familiar: the sun on the horizon. Broad brushstrokes swept in half circles across the canvas render the composition abstract and[.....]

Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MCA Chicago

Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, MCA Chicago. April 12-August 3, 2014. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Isa Genzken: Retrospective—an expansive four-decade survey of the German artist’s work at MCA Chicago featuring sculpture, film, installation, painting, and photography—is the fact that it was all made by the same person. Over the course of her career, Genzken has successfully assimilated a wide array of styles without losing sight of a handful of core concerns: architectural structure, the[.....]

William Cordova: Ceiba: Reconsidering Ephemeral Spaces at MDC Museum of Art + Design

Installed in the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami, William Cordova’s exhibition Ceiba: Reconsidering Ephemeral Spaces shares a geopolitical bond with the building in which it is located. Now a venue for Miami-Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design, the Freedom Tower’s original tenant was the Miami News & Metropolis newspaper. After a period of vacancy, it served as an immigration center for Cuban refugees fleeing[.....]

Sandra Ono: low tide at Conduit Gallery

Sandra Ono. Untitled, 2013; Mop heads and glue, 37.5 x 49 x 9 in.

Today from our friends at Glasstire, we bring you a review of Sandra Ono’s solo exhibition at Conduit Gallery in Dallas, Texas. Author Alejo Benedetti notes, “While many found-object artists attempt to aggrandize the ordinary, Ono recognizes her materials for what they are. The works are beautiful, delicate, and have a commanding presence, but they are also in on the joke.” This article was originally[.....]

Love & Ground: Interview with Conny Purtill and Friends

Conny Purtill. The Ground, 2014; installation view, Adams and Ollman Gallery, Portland, OR. Courtesy of the Artists and Adams and Ollman.

As an idea and word, “curator” continues to suffer a death from overdose. Still, I am tempted to place this burdensome phrase upon Conny Purtill and his chosen allies—that is, if we can agree that curating involves working with someone else’s objects to elucidate a concept. The exhibition The Ground, recently on view at Adams and Ollman Gallery in Portland, Oregon, began with Purtill gifting[.....]