Posts Tagged ‘Sculpture’

Jason Kalogiros: The Measure, The Weight, The Ground, The Scale at CAPITAL

Jason Kalogiros. Untitled (Drawing), 2015; unique gelatin silver photograph; 24 x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Capital, San Francisco.

 Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jason Kalogiros’ current solo show at Capital in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs notes, “[T]he artist employs the methodology of photography to interrogate the discrete boundaries between media.” This article was originally published on July 2, 2015. The process of making a photograph bears striking resemblance to the process of making a bronze sculpture.[…..]

Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Invariant Interval, 2013; installation view, Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature, 2015. Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC. Photo: Rick Rhodes.

The desire to create forms via chance and natural phenomena is reflected in the works in Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. Despite a disparate range of formats, including porcelain sculpture, complex wire installations, and color aquatints, this exhibition brings together a wide array of works that originate from a process-based practice and share connections to[…..]

Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Mark Mothersbaugh. My Little Pony, 2013; ceramics; 53 x 59 x 33 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) is a timeless sort of place. Sure, its first floor boasts an urban-inspired coffee bar with contemporary furnishings that gesture toward the present day, but the galleries tell a different story of time altogether. From costumes to hand-painted ceramics, ritual objects to period rooms, the MIA offers abstract snapshots of other places and other times, mixing centuries and geographies[…..]

Hao Ni: Ghost Hit Wall at Yellow Peril Gallery

Hao Ni. window IV, 2015 (detail); windows, stickers, tape, paper, spray paint on glass, acrylic paint on plastic; 48 x 60 x10 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

To enter Hao Ni’s exhibition Ghost Hit Wall, currently on view at Yellow Peril Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island, is to step into a space where the familiar becomes strange and the strange becomes eerily, disconcertingly familiar. Bracingly present yet vaguely surreal, the works—ranging from painting and sculpture to video and mixed-media installation—are installed as a cohesive whole. Yet, as this incisive exhibition makes clear, cohesion[…..]

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament at Frye Art Museum

Leo Saul Berk. Structure and Ornament, 2014; plywood, acrylic; 120 x 213 x 59 in. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Mark Woods.

Can architecture transform lives? Can it transform us? These questions lay the foundation for Structure and Ornament, a solo exhibition of work by Seattle-based artist Leo Saul Berk, on view at Frye Art Museum. Presented in a meandering array of multimedia sculpture, site-specific installation, and video with sound, Berk’s ongoing series is a reflection on his childhood home in Aurora, Illinois—a site formative to his personal and artistic growth. In the[…..]

Simon Denny: The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1

Simon Denny. New Management, 2014; installation view, Portikus, Frankfurt. Photo: Helena Schlichting. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Startup culture is ripe for satire. The tech industry’s social and economic dominance makes it a necessary target, and its penchant for jargon-heavy, wildly inflated rhetoric makes it an easy one. Mike Judge’s HBO sitcom, Silicon Valley, deftly picks the low-hanging fruit, but it hardly needs to. The elevator pitches of most weak-to-average startups on the venture-capital trail, quixotically ascribing revolutionary potential to the most[…..]

Interview with Erica Prince

Some Sense of Comfort With Some Sense of Confusio​​n​, 2014​, (performance still). Courtesy of AUX Performance Space, Philadelphia​.​

Canadian artist Erica Prince would not appreciate the Mattel playhouse I had as a kid, filled with floral furniture, plastic appliances, and female dolls to ensure that the household was running smoothly. Prince’s version, recently on view in Philadelphia, is my playhouse’s conceptual opposite—and that’s a wonderful thing. Prince is more inspired by science fiction than by domesticity. Her sculptures, installations, and drawings have a[…..]