Posts Tagged ‘Sculpture’

John Buck at Robischon Gallery

John Buck. The Immigration, 2016; jelutong wood, acrylic paint, leather, motors; 114 x 268 x 168 in. Courtesy of Robischon Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Kate Nicholson reviews John Buck at Robischon Gallery in Denver. John Buck’s colossal kinetic sculptures draw passersby into Robischon Gallery, including families[…..]

Fan Mail: Meeson Pae Yang

Meeson Pae Yang. Index, 2005–06; steel, glass, fluorescent lights, Plexiglas, sucrose solution, vinyl tubing, electrical components, vacuum-sealed packaging, latex, silicone, silicone tubing, polyurethane, trimmer line, nylon fittings; 78 x 114 x 36 in. Courtesy of El Camino College, Torrance, CA and the Artist.

Science and art have a variably rocky relationship in contemporary culture; it is not unusual to encounter people who believe these fields to be opposites on the spectrum of human inquiry. But Meeson Pae Yang’s body of work rejects such binary thinking. Her practice utilizes the affective and technical qualities of the natural sciences to create large works and immersive environments that direct viewers’ gazes[…..]

Fan Mail: Sarah Beth Woods

Sarah Beth Woods. A Big Diamond, 2016; hair weave, foam, door-knocker earrings; 67 x 7 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

True to its name, the BRAID/WORK series by Sarah Beth Woods operates within layers of social and material meaning, revealing a deconstructionist character even as it replicates the physical act of weaving. In the creation of these pieces, Woods pulls apart the concepts that make them legible. BRAID/WORK includes a 2016 performance and collaboration between Woods and the Malian-American professional hair braider, teacher, and entrepreneur[…..]

Anywhere But Here at Bétonsalon Center for Art and Research

May 1, 1931—Thousands of people gather in the forest of Vincennes in the eastern outskirts of Paris to stroll around newly built re-creations of pagodas, palaces, and huts while observing the forest’s temporary tenants: whole tribes and families brought in from the French colonies in Africa and Asia. Meanwhile in Paris, the Surrealists are at work staging a counter-exhibition and publishing “The Truth About the[…..]

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh

Simone Leigh. "Althea", 2016; Terra-cotta, India ink, porcelain, cobalt and epoxy. Courtesy of the Artist and the Hammer Museum. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Colony Little explores Simone Leigh’s first West Coast solo exhibition at the Hammer in Los Angeles.

Summer Session – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the Work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Lin Tianmiao, Badges, 2011-12, White silk, colored silk thread, painted stainless steel embroidery frame, sound component, Installation, dimensions variable. Individual diameters of 55, 80, 100, and 120 cm. Image courtesy the artist

Continuing our June Summer Session theme of labor, today we bring you this review that deals with gendered, often invisible labor. Author Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This article was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly,[…..]

Summer Session – Simon Denny: The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1

Simon Denny. New Management, 2014; installation view, Portikus, Frankfurt. Photo: Helena Schlichting. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Labor is the first theme in our Summer Session series, and today we’re looking back at Alex Bigman’s review of The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1, an exhibition by Simon Denny that addresses innovation, promotion, the tech industry, and “the international echo chamber of startup discourse.” This article was originally published on June 25, 2015. Startup culture is ripe for satire. The tech industry’s social and economic[…..]