Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

Franz Erhard Walther and Pae White at the Henry Art Gallery

Franz Erhard Walther. Sehkanal (with body weight and exertion exposing one's opposite number to one's gaze - sight channel) Single Element n°46 of 1.Werksatz, 1968. Green fabric: 30 x 740 x 20 cm. Courtesy of Galerie Jocelyn Wolff. Photo credit: Timm Rautert. Copyright Franz Erhard Walther Foundation, Timm Rautert.

The Henry Art Gallery in Seattle opens two exhibitions, Franz Erhard Walther: The Body Draws and Pae White: Command-Shift-4. The featured artists—albeit separated by 24 years and 5,600 miles—create a compelling juxtaposition, revealing shared interests in graphic art, architecture, and fiber as mediums that shift between sculpture and performance. Both artists produce works that are liminal and in flux—forever making and remaking themselves through direct interaction.[…..]

Genius/21 Century/Seattle at the Frye Art Museum

Lead Pencil Studio (Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo). Under the Surface, 2008; charcoal graphite and paint on paper; 71 x 58 in. Courtesy of the Artists.

For the last thirteen years, Seattle has cheekily retorted the MacArthur Foundation’s annual announcement of “Genius Grant” winners by presenting a roster of its own local “geniuses” through the Stranger Genius Award. The Stranger, which is the city’s weekly alternative news and entertainment paper, selects and awards five individuals each year, from the fields of art, performance, literature, film, and music, with $5,000 of unrestricted[…..]

Martin Creed: Work No. 360 at the Henry Art Gallery

Martin Creed. Work No. 360: Half the air in a given space, 2015. Installation view. Courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. Photo: RJ Sánchez, Solstream Studios.

Let’s just state the obvious: Martin Creed’s Work No. 360: Half the Air in a Given Space, on view at Henry Art Gallery, is insanely fun to experience. Pushing your way through a space filled (true to the installation’s title, only halfway) with over 37,000 pearly gray balloons is like being in a mosh pit, surrounded by marshmallows. It’s a ridiculous image, to be sure,[…..]

Disguise: Masks & Global African Art at Seattle Art Museum

Brendan Fernandes. As One, 2015; HD video loop; 22:54 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.

Museums are constantly devising new platforms to present their permanent collections. Interventions and mining-the-museum have become commonplace curatorial strategies, and institutions frequently turn to contemporary artists to animate, recontextualize, and bring visibility to canonized cultural objects. Disguise: Masks and Global African Art is Seattle Art Museum’s latest attempt to draw connections across temporal, geographic, and cultural lines. Leveraging the museum’s collection of African masks, the[…..]

CONSTRUCT\S at the Wing Luke Museum

Lynne Yamamoto. Whither House, 2015; installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Wing Luke Museum. Photo: Toryan Dixon.

CONSTRUCT\S: Installations by Asian Pacific American Women Artists at the Wing Luke Museum is a journey into the lives and minds of six artists who employ a range of media and creative tactics to explore sociocultural identity, familial history, and locality. The exhibition does not claim to be a comprehensive survey of “Asian Pacific American art.” Rather, it provides an array of entry points into[…..]

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament at Frye Art Museum

Leo Saul Berk. Structure and Ornament, 2014; plywood, acrylic; 120 x 213 x 59 in. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Mark Woods.

Can architecture transform lives? Can it transform us? These questions lay the foundation for Structure and Ornament, a solo exhibition of work by Seattle-based artist Leo Saul Berk, on view at Frye Art Museum. Presented in a meandering array of multimedia sculpture, site-specific installation, and video with sound, Berk’s ongoing series is a reflection on his childhood home in Aurora, Illinois—a site formative to his personal and artistic growth. In the[…..]

Molly Dilworth: 2421 Miles at ALL RISE

Molly Dilworth. 2421 Miles, 2015; Courtesy of ALL RISE. Photo: Max Cleary

“When I worked for the Seattle Times fifteen years ago, our building overlooked this lot,” remarked Molly Dilworth during a recent artist talk. Her project, 2421 Miles, is a 52,000-square-foot earthwork (organized in collaboration with ALL RISE) located on a vacant city block in the heart of downtown. Returning to the site this spring was a homecoming of sorts for the Brooklyn-based artist. The ALL[…..]