Posts Tagged ‘SFMOMA’

Notes on Visual Activism

Conference attendees participating in Carmen Papalia's Blind Field Shuffle (2014).

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you four different views on the recent Visual Activism conference, hosted by SFMOMA at the Brava Theater, March 14–15, 2014. Artists, curators, and scholars presented their thoughts on institutional domains, art, and activism. Four visual critics, Danielle Jackson, Natalie Catasús, Colin Partch, and Omar Mismar, were situated at points radiating out from the auditorium of the Brava Theater[…..]

SFMOMA Is On the Go: Five Reasons to Track It Down

As part of our ongoing partnership with KQED, today we bring you a look at how SFMOMA is continuing to produce exhibitions and events even though the museum will be closed until 2016. While there’s no denying that this is a hardship for San Francisco’s art community, it’s also an opportunity for SFMOMA to become a more flexible institution that works beyond the boundaries of[…..]

Time After Time: “The Clock” at SFMOMA

Christian Marclay, video still from The Clock, 2010; single-channel video with stereo sound, 24 hours; White Cube Mason’s Yard, London, October 15–November 13, 2010; courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York, and White Cube, London. Photo: Todd-White Photography; © Christian Marclay. The White Cube gallery arrangement is slightly different from the SFMOMA arrangement I describe.

Everyone I know who saw Christian Marclay’s Clock raved about it. The 24-hour sequence of film clips, most with a view of a clock face, is more action-packed than I’d imagined it would be. The focus is as much on the events surrounding the passage of time as on the instruments we use to measure that passage. In this way, The Clock isn’t about clocks[…..]

#Hashtags: Going Up at SFMOMA

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #92, 1981; chromogenic color print; 24 x 47 15/16" (61 x 121.9 cm); The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Fellows of Photography Fund; ©2012 Cindy Sherman.

There are so many things to look at in a museum–but that doesn’t mean that art doesn’t exist in unplanned and accidental encounters. Today #Hashtags reprints one of our favorite essays from last year, on the topic of uncurated looking. It was miraculous to me, only because I had never seen the space behind the doors. Yet, it was shameful, as if I had seen[…..]

Jay DeFeo: Spatial Relations

If you back your way into the Jay DeFeo exhibition at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, you’ll discover, as I did, a group of five oil paintings in the final gallery. The works are small by today’s standards of monumentality and smaller still by the standards of DeFeo’s most famous work, The Rose. The Rose, occupying its own alcove earlier in the show, is[…..]

#museumpractices: The Museum on My Mind, Part III

Marksfi

Wall labels. Curatorial text. Provenance. Titles (or un-titles, as the case may be). At what point do the words surrounding an artwork serve the work, and at what point do they disrupt it? In terms of the museum, specifically, when do explanatory labels benefit museum-goers, and when do they detract from an individual’s experience? This week, #Hashtags features Part III of The Museum On My[…..]

#museumpractices: The Museum On My Mind, Part II

Wall labels. Curatorial text. Provenance. Titles (or un-titles, as the case may be). At what point do the words surrounding an artwork serve the work, and at what point do they disrupt it? In terms of the museum, specifically, when do explanatory labels benefit museum-goers, and when do they detract from an individual’s experience? This week, #Hashtags features Part II of The Museum On My[…..]