Posts Tagged ‘surveillance’

#EVIDENCE: Anouk Kruithof at Casemore Kirkeby

Anouk Kruithof. #EVIDENCE; 2017. Exhibition installation. Courtesy of Casemore Kirkeby.

#EVIDENCE, the current solo exhibition by Dutch-born, Mexico City–based artist Anouk Kruithof at Casemore Kirkeby Gallery, presents a sprawling series of related bodies of work inspired by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel’s 1977 book, Evidence. Kruithof’s range of photo-based works, made mostly in 2015, do not replicate or repeat Sultan and Mandel’s project, but rather carry it forward through strategies that are carefully calculated to[…..]

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Broker at Postmasters Gallery

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy. BROKER (still), 2016; video, 28 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists and Postmasters Gallery. Photo: Evan Schwartz

The Postmasters Gallery’s arched storefront entrance on Franklin Street in New York City’s Financial District conjures an era long gone, when artists inhabited the raw lofts of the area. High ceilings with brick and rustic Corinthian columns belie the sleek high-rise trend seeping into the city, which aptly form the setting of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s latest exhibition, BROKER. Well-loved for their maquettes often featuring[…..]

Luis Cruz Azaceta: War and Other Disasters at Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts

Luis Cruz Azaceta. Hell Act, 2009; acrylic, charcoal, pencil, and shellac on canvas; 72 x 160 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts.

Over the past four decades, Luis Cruz Azaceta has continued to mine the vast possibilities of expressionism—a style that often lends itself to forms of humanism, idealism, originality, and angst that feel more fitting for the 20th century than our current moment. Yet the artist is vigilant in his desire to respond to the world around him, and refuses to retreat into a formal world[…..]

Summer Session – Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870

Alison Jackson. The Queen plays with her Corgies, from the series Confidential, 2007; chromogenic print; 16 x 12 in. Courtesy the Artist and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles. © Alison Jackson.

For today’s Summer Session topic of celebrity, we bring you Genevieve Quick’s review from our sister publication Art Practical of the 2010 SFMOMA exhibition Exposed, a show on the history of photography and the camera. Our contemporary fascination with celebrities is heavily shaped by the photographic medium, and Exposed explored some of the earliest iterations of the iconic paparazzi shot that is a quintessential celebrity experience. This review was originally published[…..]

Trevor Paglen at Altman Siegel Gallery

Trevor Paglen. Circles, 2015 (video still); video; 12:00. Courtesy of the Artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Trevor Paglen’s current exhibition at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. Author John Zarobell writes, “[The work] represents both a bit of art-historical posturing and an active response to government surveillance that allows viewers to imagine an alternative to our current condition. Perhaps a gallery is as good a place as any to[…..]

Moving Walls 22 / Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations-New York

Mishka Henner. Dutch Landscapes, 2011;
Archival pigment print.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Mary Coyne reviews Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations in New York City. Edward Snowden’s revelatory findings of pervasive surveillance by the NSA fundamentally changed[…..]

Jessamyn Lovell: Dear Erin Hart at SF Camerawork

Jessamyn Lovell. Following 6 (Fence), 2014; digital print on vinyl; 96 x 133 in. Courtesy of the Artist and SF Camerawork, San Francisco.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you a review of artist Jessamyn Lovell’s surveillance photography—artwork that has an incredible backstory. Author Genevieve Quick notes, “By leaving the project open-ended, Lovell smartly expands the work beyond revenge and allows viewers to consider its complexities through their own moral codes.” This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. In Jessamyn Lovell’s exhibition Dear Erin Hart,[…..]