Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Fan Mail: Laura Moore

Laura Moore.  One Man's Junk, (ongoing series) 2014; hand carved Indiana Limestone; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Paul Cimoroni.

From the height of a pedestrian bridge over a railroad track in Toronto, artist Laura Moore saw the remains of a computer monitor gazing screen- or face-up at her from the tracks. The happenstance experience provoked a number of questions about contemporary society’s rapidly changing relationship and progressive entanglement with technology. Mainly the artist wondered: Why was this monitor marched up a steep set of[…..]

Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978-2014 at Postmasters Gallery

Anton Perich. American Altarpiece, 2004. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of Postmasters Gallery, New York

“No, Wade Guyton did not invent a new paintbrush; Anton Perich did in 1978, when Guyton was six.” Thus combatively begins the press release for Anton Perich: Electric Paintings 1978–2014 at Postmasters Gallery. The un-cited author of the claim that “Wade Guyton invented a new paintbrush” is Jerry Saltz, writing on Guyton’s 2012 survey at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Of course, Saltz was[…..]

Stan VanDerBeek: Poemfield at the Box

Stan VanDerBeek: Poemfield at The Box, Los Angeles (installation view). Courtesy of the Estate of Stan VanDerBeek and The Box, LA. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

From the malevolent mainframe of 2001’s “Hal” to the proliferation of remote-controlled, drone-delivered destruction, dystopian visions of technology exist in abundance. Even contemporary artists who work with technology, like Cory Arcangel and Wade Guyton, tend to focus on its glitches and limitations. By contrast, the Box’s dazzling exhibition of computer-animated films by Stan VanDerBeek offers a hopeful perspective on the promise of technology, one that[…..]

AnnieLaurie Erickson: Data Shadows at Carroll Gallery

AnnieLaurie Erickson. Local Server Series, 2014; installation view, Data Shadows, 2014. Courtesy of AnnieLaurie Erickson and Tulane University. Photo: AnnieLaurie Erickson

Photographer AnnieLaurie Erickson has spent a lot of time lately being watched by law enforcement. In her recent trip this year to Oklahoma, she stood on public property, taking photographs while security guards, local officers, and state police looked on. One might ask, what has she been photographing that requires so much surveillance? The answer is: big data centers throughout the Southern United States, the[…..]

Locating Technology: Against Recognition

Zach Blas. Facial Weaponization Suite Communiqué: Fag Face, 2012 (video still); HD video; 08:10. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Zach Blas.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an essay by Emily K. Holmes, who analyzes the work of artist Zach Blas: “Blas creates space for facial-recognition technology to be not only strange, but dangerous and deserving of our critical questioning.” This article was originally published on April 16, 2014. Biometric technologies aim to “authenticate” and “verify” individuals by digitally scanning physical traits on[…..]

Ryan Trecartin at LACMA

Considered a prophet of the digital age, video artist Ryan Trecartin transforms contemporary culture’s addiction to the internet and obsession with technological devices into a violently exuberant visual orgy. Watching his work feels like riding a roller coaster into the vertiginous depths of the Web or looking through a kaleidoscope on acid; it is an experience of hysterical nonlinearity, relentless mutation, and extreme visual and verbal cacophony. On March 25,[…..]

Locating Technology: Participatory Economics

Bernie Lubell. A Theory of Entanglement (Detail of knitting after two days), 2009; pine, maple, rubber rope, black poly cord, and music wire; 32 x 40 x 60 ft. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the latest installment of Genevieve Quick‘s Locating Technology column, which explores “the evolution of technology and its effects on artists’ processes, disciplinarity, and the larger social context of media creation, dispersal, access, and interactivity.” This column was originally published on February 12, 2014. The trajectory of history suggests that increased opportunities for individuals to engage in[…..]