Posts Tagged ‘Text’

Pope.L: Desert at Steve Turner and Pope.L: Forest at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Pope.L. Forest, installation view, Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. © Pope.L

Pope.L returns to Los Angeles, after his MOCA exhibition William Pope.L: Trinket this past summer, with a two-part, two-gallery, map-sprawling, time-spanning show—Desert at Steve Turner in Hollywood and Forest at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects in Culver City—connected by a downloadable GPS driving tour. Samuel Beckett, whose influence appeared in Trinket, returns again in the GPS guide’s insistently jolted repetitive language, “this thing this thing this thing[…..]

Michael Waugh: Boom at Von Lintel Gallery

Michael Waugh. Derivative (FCIR, part 5), 2015 (detail); ink on mylar; 42 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Von Lintel Gallery.

Michael Waugh’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Boom, is currently on view at Von Lintel Gallery. Using ink on Mylar, Waugh reimagines an assortment of 19th-century tableaux, depicting quaint scenes of countryside estates and horse stables, as well as turn-of-the-century buildings on New York City streets. These representational drawings consist wholly of handwritten text: Scribbled sentences produce the contour lines of buildings as they[…..]

Barbara Kruger: Early Works at Skarstedt Gallery

Barbara Kruger. Untitled (Don't buy us with apologies), 1986; photostat print in artist's frame; 48 3/4 x

54 7/8 in. (123.8 x 139.5 cm.) framed. Courtesy of the Artist and Skarstedt.

It’s a funny thing to be able to go back and reconsider an artist’s early works after thirty years, partly because the time capsule of memory remembers the work in the context in which it was made. Viewing the work again in the present reflects the context of that prior time as it’s understood now. The aggressively fast-paced 1980s are faster in memory than they[…..]

Glenn Ligon: Call and Response at Camden Art Centre

Glenn Ligon. Live (detail), 2014; video installation; size variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Camden Art Centre, London. Photo: Valerie Bennett

The designation Call and Response describes the antiphony effect, a device in speech in which a speaker elicits cadenced responses from the audience at systematic intervals. It’s a method that actively engages an audience, and although this universal device is as old as human speech in every corner of the world, in the American psyche it is particularly tied to black churches and the gospel[…..]

Remembering the Dead

Joseph Grigely. The Gregory Battcock Archive, 2009-2014; Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art.
Courtesy of Air de Paris, Paris. Photo: Andrés Ramírez.

From our friends at Bad at Sports, today we bring you another assessment of the Whitney Biennial, which closes this coming Sunday. Author Jessica Cochran examines the archival nature of the current exhibition and notes, “…as the art world grows ever bigger in size and speed, one can only hope that the Whitney Biennial continues to make room for the discursive, textual, and ‘tossed-aside particulars.’” This[…..]

Speaking Directly: Interview with Tony Discenza

Tony Discenza, TRANSPORTED, 2010.  Vinyl on aluminum, 30 x 24 inches

Tony Discenza’s text-based work is concise yet absurd: the tone is often matter-of-fact while the content is speculative and fanciful. The appropriated formats of a street sign or a book’s teaser page provide an internal logic that holds the tension of this paradox quite neatly. Obviously, I’m a fan, so I asked him to chat with me about his recent projects. Discenza’s solo and collaborative[…..]

Anthony Discenza: Everything Will Probably Work Out OK

Opening Thursday, May 13th and running through Saturday the 15th is a flash project at Catherine Clark Gallery‘s New York space, the 14th Street Studio. The show, entitled Everything Will Probably Work Out OK, will feature recent work by Oakland, CA-based Anthony Discenza. Discenza’s text-based work is both literary-minded and low-brow laugh-inducing, and references the artist’s interest in what he calls an “internal viewing experience,”[…..]