Posts Tagged ‘textiles’

Hammer Projects: N. Dash at The Hammer Museum

N. Dash. Untitled, 2014; adobe, oil, pigment, string, acrylic, linen, jute, and wood support. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: The Hammer Museum.

N. Dash’s solo exhibit at the Hammer Museum begins with a series of Duratrans transparencies displaying magnified wreaths of frayed fabric in architectural light boxes. Her work, which faces the open and airy courtyard of the Los Angeles museum, was presented in conjunction with the Mandala of Compassion for two weeks, a live exhibit in which Tibetan Buddhist monks constructed a sacred mandala using colored sands[.....]

Pia Camil: The Little Dog Laughed at Blum & Poe

Pia Camil, The Little Dog Laughed, Installation view, 2014, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles; l. Asfalto, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 94 1/2 x 94 1/2 inches.
r. The little dog laughed, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 108 1/4 x 330 11/16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

Pia Camil’s hand-dyed and stitched canvases offer a fresh approach to the well-worn field of geometric abstraction. For her first solo show in Los Angeles, this Mexico City-based artist has created four large, square wall works whose surfaces are divided into loose grids of colored stripes. Each work has a dominant color theme—cream, tan, blue, and purple—with brighter accents of yellow, red, and peach. Within[.....]

Fan Mail: Rachel Brumer

Rachel Brumer. Memory’s Main Gate XI, 2008; van dyke on hand dyed pima cotton, acrylic, wax; 22.5” x 29” inches. Image courtesy of Mark Frey.

Transitioning from one distinct medium to another is often a challenge—one that many artists attempt. However, not all accomplish it with the seeming ease of Rachel Brumer. Working in varying combinations of textile, installation, sculpture, photography, and collage, Brumer diligently investigates a number of subjects. Foremost in her work is an almost pathological focus on remembering and honoring people, places, and moments through what she[.....]

Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Yin Xiuzhen, Portable City, Sydney, 2003       photo: Yin Xiuzhen         collection by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, image courtesy the artist

Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly, however, some female contemporary Chinese artists have chosen to work with thread and textiles—and embroidery—in experimental, maybe even revolutionary ways. From Lin Tianmiao’s overt exploration of sexuality, fecundity, and the aging and decay of the body, to Yin Xiuzhen’s use of the embodied memories[.....]

An Interview with Leeah Joo

Leeah Joo. Flight of Crane Wives, 2013; oil on wood panel; 16 x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

In her most recent collection of paintings, Dokkebis and Other Tales, Leeah Joo conjures myths by way of textiles. Joo, who was born in Seoul, South Korea, immigrated to the U.S. at age 10. She received her MFA in Painting from the Yale School of Art, and her work has been featured nationally. Next year, Joo’s work will be featured in February at Artspace in New[.....]

Installation Art Reverses Production and Consumption Process

Ni Haifeng. Para-production, 2008-2012; textile shreds, sewing machines; work in progress, variable size

As part of our ongoing partnership with Beautiful/Decay, today we bring you the installation work of artist Ni Haifeng. For the better part of the last decade, Ni has been working with concepts of manufacturing and production, illustrating, in the words of curator and scholar Pauline J. Yao, “the symbolic systems that govern the movement of certain goods across international borders.” This article was written[.....]

The Right Stuff: Amir H. Fallah at Gallery Wendi Norris

In our predominantly consumerist society, it is increasingly difficult to disconnect ourselves from our belongings. Barbara Kruger summarized the contemporary Cartesian dualism when she created her 1987 piece, “I Shop Therefore I am.” The more we define ourselves through our endlessly multiplying clutter, the harder it is to relate to others who don’t share our specific collection of objects onto which we project meaning and[.....]