Posts Tagged ‘textiles’

Summer Session – Honor our Wrinkles: Fiber, Women, Dykes and Queers

L.J. Roberts. Daniel Rosza Lang/Levitsky Singing at the 2013 NYC Dyke March, 2013; single-strand embroidery on cotton; 4 x 8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you a thoughtful conversation between the artists L.J. Roberts and Sheila Pepe. Roberts asks, “What does it mean to have men who are making work that pertains to being a man—about men, male desire, and masculinity—appropriating traditional women’s work and theory that is grounded in feminism, without much accountability?” This interview was originally published on our sister site Art Practical on February 26,[…..]

Summer Session – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the Work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Lin Tianmiao, Badges, 2011-12, White silk, colored silk thread, painted stainless steel embroidery frame, sound component, Installation, dimensions variable. Individual diameters of 55, 80, 100, and 120 cm. Image courtesy the artist

Continuing our June Summer Session theme of labor, today we bring you this review that deals with gendered, often invisible labor. Author Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This article was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly,[…..]

From the Archives – Weaving, Not Cloth: Mark Bradford at SFMOMA

Mark Bradford, Potable Water, 2005; billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, and additional mixed media; 130 x 196 inches; collection of Hunter Gray; © Mark Bradford; photo: Bruce M. White

We always like to see artist Mark Bradford’s name pop up in the press. Of course, there’s the fantastic news that Bradford will be representing the U.S. in this year’s Venice Biennale, in addition to last week’s cheekily delivered critique of art auctions (while onsite at Christie’s). Today, we’re republishing Bean Gilsdorf’s meditations on the tactility of Bradford’s work in relation to textiles. This article[…..]

From the Archives – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Yin Xiuzhen, Portable City, Sydney, 2003       photo: Yin Xiuzhen         collection by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, image courtesy the artist

For Labor Day weekend, we bring you this piece from the archives that deals with gendered, often invisible labor—the kind not celebrated on national labor days. Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese women artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This review was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said[…..]

Some Parallels in Textiles and Composition

Vox amp. Photo: Rebecca Gates

As the discipline of sound art develops and becomes more common, artists, including those working in textiles, are exploring ways to relate to and collaborate with sound.

Ann Hamilton: The Common S E N S E at Henry Art Gallery

Ann Hamilton, the common S E N S E, 2014, courtesy of Henry Art Gallery, Seattle. Photo: Jonathan Vanderweit.

I was instantly drawn to the Siberian Rubythroat. It must have been the vibrant red flash of exposed underbelly that first caught my eye, but it was the bird’s placement that focused my attention, a diminutive creature adrift in a mauve fog. The Rubythroat is just one of 200 animal specimens that have been scanned, printed in multiple, and hung in a mosaic of thick[…..]

Hammer Projects: N. Dash at The Hammer Museum

N. Dash. Untitled, 2014; adobe, oil, pigment, string, acrylic, linen, jute, and wood support. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: The Hammer Museum.

N. Dash’s solo exhibit at the Hammer Museum begins with a series of Duratrans transparencies displaying magnified wreaths of frayed fabric in architectural light boxes. Her work, which faces the open and airy courtyard of the Los Angeles museum, was presented in conjunction with the Mandala of Compassion for two weeks, a live exhibit in which Tibetan Buddhist monks constructed a sacred mandala using colored sands[…..]