Posts Tagged ‘value’

Summer Reading – Finding Value in a Flattened Field

Anna Gray + Ryan Wilson Paulsen. 100 Posterworks, 2009–2013; printed poster; 11 x 17 in. Courtesy of the Artists.

Today for our Summer Reading series we bring you Patricia Maloney’s recent op-ed from our partners at Art Practical. The author notes, “The commitment to paying contributors must be acknowledged as only the most visible link in a long chain of interlocking, concrete exchanges distributed throughout the ecosystem. Paying a writer or artist is not a unidirectional transaction; it is part of a public health policy.” This[…..]

Summer Reading – (Un)doing (Un)compensation

Caroline Woolard. cards, 2010. Courtesy of the Artist.

In selecting the articles for our Summer Reading series—ones that we think exemplify current issues in the field of contemporary art—we would be remiss if we did not include Caroline Woolard’s consideration of “[the] seven ways in which I attempt to navigate inequity within institutions and collective projects.” This article was originally published in Art Practical’s special issue “Valuing Labor in the Arts” on April 3, 2014.[…..]

The Great Debate About Art at Upfor

Ben Buswell. ABRACADABRA (Perish Like the Word), 2015; graphite and non-photo blue; 38 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Upfor. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

“Art” is a contentious word. Endless positing over any succinct, defining properties has spawned countless op-eds, theses, and textbooks. The topic is comparable to that of discussing religion in mixed company—differences of opinion have more than once drawn blood. The Great Debate About Art, currently on view at Upfor in Portland, Oregon, is a small group exhibition contextually centered on Roy Harris’ 2010 book of[…..]

Summer Reading: Give Us CPR

Street view of Knoedler & Co.

As the editors of Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts[…..]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Reigniting Public Art Policy as Social Practice

Jeremy Deller, Scott King and William Morris. A poster in response to the British government’s 2010 proposal to cut funding for the arts by 25 percent.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Jeffrey Skoller’s response to the workshop “Appropriate Technologies,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Skoller asserts, “Given how many young artists today are making art as social practice, relational aesthetics, and cultural activism, and who are devoting their careers to social activism, it is striking that there is[…..]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Negotiating Terms and Setting Precedents

Gauging the Grey Area workshop, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Joseph del Pesco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Patricia Maloney’s response to the workshop “Gauging the Gray Area: Standards for Artistic Labor,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Maloney notes, “…negotiation is the most demonstrable and effective means of creating agency.” This article was originally published on May 22, 2014. “Gauging the[…..]

On Laboring for Love

Shannon Finnegan. 8 Hours of Work, 2012 (performance still); Saturday, June 9, 2012, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Presented by Recession Art in conjunction with Everything Is Index, Nothing Is History at the Invisible Dog, Brooklyn. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you another installment from their excellent issue on valuing labor in the arts. In this essay, author Elyse Mallouk (also an artist) notes, “While artists struggle publicly to make the value of art work visible, they are bound as a corporate body by the uncertainties and sacrifices they share in common… Artists can gain power by[…..]