Posts Tagged ‘video’

Philippe Parreno: H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS at the Park Avenue Armory

Philippe Parreno. H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS, 2015; installation view, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Photo: James Ewing.

In Philippe Parreno’s current exhibition, H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS at the Park Avenue Armory, Danny the Street is a sprawling installation based on a DC Comics character who is a sentient stretch of roadway. The character Danny periodically inserts himself into the architecture of different cities, communicating via puffs of manhole smoke. In Parreno’s installation, Danny has inserted himself inside the Armory as a series[…..]

Hammer Projects: Mary Reid Kelley at Hammer Museum

Mary Reid Kelley with Patrick Kelley. Priapus Agonistes, 2013 (video still). Single-channel HD video, black and white, sound; 15:09 min. Courtesy of the Artists; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Fredericks & Freiser Gallery, New York; and Pilar Corrias, London.

Now on view at Hammer Museum, Mary Reid Kelley’s videos are a collision of drawing, performance, and wordplay that clatter against Greek mythology to produce a visually spare, lexically rich cycle. Working with videographer Patrick Kelley, the artist has produced three black-and-white videos that follow the story of the half-woman, half-bull Minotaur, her lust-crazed mother Pasiphae, and her helpless sister Ariadne through boldly drawn landscapes.[…..]

Doug Hall: The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described at SFAI

Doug Hall. The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described, 1987; video still, San Francisco Art Institute, Walter and McBean Galleries. Collection of SFMOMA, purchased through a gift of the Modern Art Council and the San Francisco Art Dealers Association. © Doug Hall. Photo: Gregory Goode.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Doug Hall’s The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described, currently on view at the Walter and McBean Galleries of the San Francisco Art Institute. Author Maria Porges notes: “Perhaps the most fascinating thing about Hall’s seminal work is its quality of timelessness.” This article was originally published on May 21, 2015. In 1989, the San Francisco[…..]

FOCUS: Mario García Torres at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Mario García Torres. The Schlieren Plot,n.d.; HD video and sound, 29 minutes. Courtesy of the Artist and Proyectos Monclova, Mexico.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. For the next five Sundays, our Shotgun Reviews will come from the finalists for the Daily Serving/Kadist Art Foundation Writing Fellowship in Mexico City. In today’s edition, author Leslie Moody Castro reviews the work of Mexico City–based artist Mario García Torres at the Modern Art[…..]

Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades at MoMA PS1

Wael Shawky. Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades, 2015; installation view, MoMA PS1, New York, featuring marionettes from Cabaret Crusades: The Secrets of Karbala, 2015. Courtesy of MoMA PS1, New York, and Sfeir Semler Gallery, Beirut and Hamburg.

Wael Shawky’s gorgeous cinematography, sets, and marionettes fuse a child-like play with the horrors and complications of war and history.

Heidi Schwegler: Botched Execution at the Art Gym

Heidi Schwegler. Separation Anxiety_04, 2014; concrete; 16 x 16 x 6 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Art Gym at Marylhurst University.  Photo: Stephen Funk

While walking through her retrospective Botched Execution, Portland-based artist Heidi Schwegler recounted a story about a lost baby boy. He disappeared during the night—last seen falling asleep in bed between his grandparents. In the morning, he was gone. The police arrived to search the home and surrounding area, and they turned up no trace. Hours later, in the bedroom, an officer heard a small cough—a[…..]

From the Archives – Kim Anno: Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute

Kim Anno. Water City Berkeley, 2013 (still); dual-projected video; 21:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from our archives we bring you a look back at John Zarobell’s review of Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, California. The first line of the review says it all: “Why celebrate when the world is going to hell?” This article was originally published on December 22, 2013. Why celebrate when the world is going to hell? Kim Anno’s ambitious effort to envision the future of humanity[…..]