Posts Tagged ‘video’

Amy Reidel: Radar Home, 11.8.13 at the Sheldon Art Galleries

Amy Reidel. Tumor Storm, 2016; loose glitter and colored sand on printed vinyl; dimensions vary. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: David Johnson Photography

Amy Reidel’s solo exhibition, Radar Home, 11.8.13, takes its name from the date her mother received a doctor’s call. A week later, she was diagnosed with multiple myeloma—an incurable though treatable blood cancer. Though her mother has since recovered and is now cancer-free, this decisive moment in Reidel’s personal life unifies the wide-ranging works of painting, digital prints, video, sculpture, and installation on view at[…..]

Soulèvements (Uprisings) at the Jeu de Paume

Dennis Adams. Patriot, 2002; C-print mounted on aluminum; 40.5 x 54 in. Courtesy of Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Paris. Photo: Galerie Gabrielle Maubrie.

What if the imagination made mountains rise up? Georges Didi-Huberman poses this question in Soulèvements (Uprisings), a new exhibition at the Jeu de Paume National Gallery in Paris. Throughout the museum’s galleries, contemporary artworks, books, historical documents, and photographs present a potent survey on the theme of social rebellions in the West, ranging from Victor Hugo’s call for the abolition of the death penalty (in[…..]

Tales of Our Time at the Guggenheim Museum

Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Can’t Help Myself, 2016; Kuka industrial robot, stainless steel and rubber, cellulose ether in colored water, lighting grid with Cognex visual-recognition sensors, and polycarbonate wall with aluminum frame. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection © Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Photo: David Heald.

Let’s talk about the apocalypse. It looms over Tales of Our Time, an exhibition of newly commissioned works by contemporary Chinese artists at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, from a video installation literally called In The End Is The Word to the 10-foot robotic arm that violently moves blood-red ink in Sun Yuan and Peng Yu’s Can’t Help Myself. Curators Xiaoyu Weng and Hou[…..]

Edgar Arceneaux: Written in Fire and Smoke

Edgar Arceneaux, Until, Until, Until…, 2016; HD video installation, spotlights, coat stand, makeup table, stool, clothing, hats, shoes, drop curtains, bar, monitors, book. Co-commissioned by the MIT List Visual Arts Center and Performa 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

Edgar Arcenaux’s exhibition at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center, Written in Fire and Smoke, is relatively modest in scale, occupying the List’s two main galleries. But while the exhibition is physically constrained, conceptually it is oversized—colossal, even. Written in Fire and Smoke is comprised of three bodies of work, all of which manifest through different material approaches. All, however, share the complexity that defines Arceneaux’s[…..]

From the Archives — Pipilotti Rist: Worry Will Vanish and Stay Stamina Stay at Hauser & Wirth

This week, the New Museum opened a major exhibition of works by path-breaking multimedia and video artist Pipilotti Rist. As author Elspeth Walker observed in her 2015 review, Rist’s work confounds the divide between the human body, the natural world, and video technologies. Fielding otherworldly experiences made from footage of this world, Rist’s installation likely felt hypnotic to many viewers for a reason—she drew inspiration from[…..]

Fan Mail: Meeson Pae Yang

Meeson Pae Yang. Index, 2005–06; steel, glass, fluorescent lights, Plexiglas, sucrose solution, vinyl tubing, electrical components, vacuum-sealed packaging, latex, silicone, silicone tubing, polyurethane, trimmer line, nylon fittings; 78 x 114 x 36 in. Courtesy of El Camino College, Torrance, CA and the Artist.

Science and art have a variably rocky relationship in contemporary culture; it is not unusual to encounter people who believe these fields to be opposites on the spectrum of human inquiry. But Meeson Pae Yang’s body of work rejects such binary thinking. Her practice utilizes the affective and technical qualities of the natural sciences to create large works and immersive environments that direct viewers’ gazes[…..]

Dineo Seshee Bopape

Today from our friends at Kadist, we bring you a video interview with South African artist Dineo Seshee Bopape. She speaks about artist-run spaces in Johannesburg, a new work commissioned by the Montreal Biennale, her current show Untitled (of Occult Instability) [Feelings] at Palais de Tokyo, and the relationship between sound and image in her video Why Do You Call Me When You Know I Can’t[…..]