Posts Tagged ‘Wangechi Mutu’

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Mary and Leigh Block Museum

Wangechi Mutu. Suspended Playtime, 2008/2013; Packing blankets, twine, garbage bags, and gold string; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

This year has been unusually promising for the visibility of work by black female artists, even while that prominence has further highlighted racially problematic attitudes within the art world. The last ten months have marked the first in which an African American woman—Carrie Mae Weems—was given a retrospective at the Guggenheim, though her triumphant entry into that pantheon led to rebukes that the museum cut the original[…..]

30 Americans at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

In a nod to Linda Nochlin’s famous query, Michele Wallace asked, “Why are there no great black artists?”[1] 30 Americans is the response to this question, a beautiful, rambunctious show that gathers the work of 31 African American artists. Unfortunately, 30 Americans, similar to Thelma Golden’s Freestyle in 2001, is not about a specific curatorial theory or thought, but rather a placing of African American[…..]

Interview with Wangechi Mutu

In February 2010, Kenyan-born, New York-based artist Wangechi Mutu was named the Deutsche Bank’s “Artist of the Year.” Her accompanying exhibition, My Dirty Little Heaven will open later this month at the Deutsche Guggenheim Museum in Berlin. Recently, DailyServing’s Aimée Reed had a chance to catch up with Mutu at her studio in Brooklyn to discuss her upcoming show, as well as the con-current exhibition[…..]

Destroying Prettiness: Wangechi Mutu and Kara Walker

Wangechi Mutu will never experience the heated backlash that Kara Walker experienced. No one will call Mutu the “patsy of the white art establishment,” accuse her of selling fellow black artists down the river, or launch a letter-writing campaign to keep her artwork from being shown. There are good reasons for this: unlike Walker, the Kenyan-born Mutu does not share the slavery lineage of African-American[…..]

Wangechi Mutu

Opening today at Victoria Miro in London,will be new work by artist Wangechi Mutu in her first UK solo exhibition. The artist will be making a departure from her earlier collages and installations with their highly critical, dark and confrontational themes and stepping into a renewed optimism and positive energy inherent in this new body of work. The exhibition’s title Yo.n.I is derived from yoni,[…..]

Wangechi Mutu

Wangechi Mutu is a Kenyan-born artist who was trained as an anthropologist and a sculptor. She has risen to much critical acclaim with her figurative collages that challenge culture and gender. The artist uses fragments of images taken from magazines to illustrate and comment on the roles of women, cultural identity, African politics and international fashion. Mutu’s figures are simultaneously attractive and repulsive and attempt[…..]