Posts Tagged ‘Whitney Museum of American Art’

Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Sophia Al-Maria. Black Friday (still), 2016; digital video projected vertically, color, sound; 16:36. Collection of the Artist. Courtesy of Anna Lena Films, Paris, and The Third Line, Dubai.

In George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), a character posits that the zombies are flocking to the mall because of “[s]ome kind of instinct. Memory. It’s what they used to do. This is an important place in their lives.” As Romero’s zombies siege the mall, the filmmaker critiques consumerism and how it has penetrated the human condition. The mall acts as a refuge, housing[…..]

Summer Session – Jeff Koons: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Jeff Koons, Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1⁄2 x 32 1⁄2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

For this month’s Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and what better contemporary artist to embody this topic than Jeff Koons, for whom celebrity and consumerism are the hallmarks of his most famous pieces? Today we bring you Alex Bigman’s review of the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum, which ran June 27–October 19, 2014. Despite Koons’ infamous reputation for banality, Bigman reminds us[…..]

Summer Session – Audio Guide Stop For Fred Wilson, Guarded View, 1991, at the Whitney

Fred Wilson. Guarded View, 1991. Sculpture, dimensions variable.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we direct you to an excerpt from Fred Wilson’s audio guide to his sculpture Guarded View for the Whitney Museum of American Art. The artist says, “When I was in college, I had been a guard for our college museum. While this was not a major experience, it was something that stayed with me a very long time. And I[…..]

Frank Stella: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Frank Stella. Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985; oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum; 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylistic shift in Frank Stella’s work has been met with fierce criticism, to say the least. Much has been written recently about his current retrospective at the Whitney, trying to connect his wildly expressive, three-dimensional works of the past few decades with his singular striped paintings of the 1960s. More than thirty years ago, Douglas Crimp characterized Stella’s late work from the 1970s as[…..]

The Whitney Museum of American Art

Image 630.006: The eastern face of the Whitney Museum. Photo: Nic Lehoux.

With the recent boom in museum building and expansion, there has been a recurring discussion of what makes a good space for art—as though an objective answer could be determined through a calculation of square footage, flexibility of design, and the ratio of natural to electric light. Indeed, the Museum of Modern Art in New York opted to demolish and rebuild its recently acquired neighboring building,[…..]

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Jeff Koons, Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1⁄2 x 32 1⁄2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

At the press preview for Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, more than one member of the Whitney Museum’s curatorial staff urged visitors to dispense with “preconceived notions” about Koons and embrace the exhibition as an opportunity to view the artist’s perhaps too-well-known oeuvre with fresh eyes. One of the largest retrospectives the Whitney has ever mounted, Jeff Koons sprawls across three floors in ascending chronological order,[…..]

Rituals of Rented Island at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Julia Heyward, God Heads, performance part of “Performances: Four Evenings, Four Days” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, February 28, 1976. Courtesy the artist

Peggy Phelan said it best: “Performance’s only life is in the present.”[1] Slippery in designation and impermanent by nature, a performance is not the same as the video of a performance. The viewer must be present for not only the sights and sounds of the performer, but also the smell, the temperature, the crowd, the fidgeting in a folding chair, or standing on a concrete[…..]