Posts Tagged ‘work’

Summer Session – Labor and Looking “Professional”

"Professional" clip art.

As we wrap up this month’s Summer Session theme of labor, today we direct our readers to Autumn Whitefield-Madrano’s consideration of the entanglements between beauty, self-presentation, and maintenance at the New Inquiry. In attempting to specify what it means it look “professional,” Whitefield-Madrano finds that labor, both real and perceived, fundamentally underpins this stylistic distinction: “You said you wanted to look professional, and I had no idea what that meant.[…..]

Summer Session: On Laboring for Love

Shannon Finnegan. 8 Hours of Work, 2012 (performance still); Saturday, June 9, 2012, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Presented by Recession Art in conjunction with Everything Is Index, Nothing Is History at the Invisible Dog, Brooklyn. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the next installment of our Summer Session—for June we’re considering the idea of labor. In this essay, author Elyse Mallouk (also an artist) notes, “While artists struggle publicly to make the value of art work visible, they are bound as a corporate body by the uncertainties and sacrifices they share in common… Artists can gain power[…..]

Rodrigo Valenzuela: Future Ruins at the Frye Art Museum

Rodrigo Valenzuela. Still from Maria TV, 2014. Digital video with audio. Courtesy of the artist.

Future Ruins, Rodrigo Valenzuela’s exhibition at the Frye Art Museum, is indeed monumental, incorporating a range of media including print, sculpture, video, and sound. The exhibition does not present a quiet, post-apocalyptic landscape that fetishizes decay; rather, Valenzuela addresses divisions of labor and the nature of work, making these complex issues manifest through the specter of the 21st-century economic landscape. And though it is discordant at[…..]

#Hashtags: International Alt Hinglish

Ai Weiwei. He Xie, 2010-present; installation view at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, 2012. Collection of the artist. Photo: Cathy Carver.

#institutions #work #language #InternationalArtEnglish Writing in Triple Canopy last year, Alix Rule and David Levine coined the term “International Art English” (hereby referred to as IAE) to describe a linguistic mode that is part polyglot, part jargon—peppered with French, German, and Latin but based on the structure of English. The authors took this hybrid language to task for lending a veneer of substance to numerous examples of art[…..]