Posts Tagged ‘Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’

From the Archives – Alien She at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

L.J. Roberts. We Couldn’t Get In. We Couldn’t Get Out., 2006–07; installation view, Alien She, 2014. Courtesy of Phocasso and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco.

Alien She’s assemblage of Riot Grrrl output continues to inspire collective feminist organizing.

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area, installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Left: Oree Originol. Justice for Our Lives, 2014-ongoing. Right: Cat Brooks with Black Lives Matter. Anti Police-Terror Project, ‘Tasha,’ 2015. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you editor Emily Holmes’ review of Take This Hammer at YBCA in San Francisco. Holmes notes, “Although there is crossover between works, particularly in regard to the social issues they address, violence is perhaps the single thread running through all of Take This Hammer. […] It takes many forms, but the exhibition particularly exposes systemic inequities and state-sanctioned[…..]

In the Dressing Room with Coco Fusco, August 19, 2015

Coco Fusco. Observations of Predation in Humans: A Lecture by Dr. Zira, Animal Psychologist, 2013 (still); performance. Courtesy of Walker Art Center. Photo: Gene Pittman.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you In the Dressing Room with Coco Fusco by Patricia Maloney and Moira Roth. In it, Coco Fusco takes us behind the scenes of her performance as Dr. Zira, the animal psychologist from Planet of the Apes, at Yerba Buena’s Radical Presence exhibition. As she removes her monkey costume backstage, Fusco opens up about performance and uniforms, economic violence, and[…..]

Radical Presence, Absence, A Body Without Politics

Girl [Chitra Ganesh + Simone Leigh]. My dreams, my works must wait till after hell... (still), 2011; Digital video, color, sound; 7:14 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Anna Martine Whitehead’s latest installation of “Endurance Tests,” a column “on current explorations of representation, the ethereal, and compulsiveness by black artists working in the field of performance.” The author notes, “[…] there is no accounting for blackness. It is too vast—it is everything—and can look any way it wants to. Or it can not look at all.” This article[…..]

Alien She at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

L.J. Roberts. We Couldn’t Get In. We Couldn’t Get Out., 2006–07; installation view, Alien She, 2014. Courtesy of Phocasso and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Alien She, an exhibition that regards the impact of Riot Grrrl culture on contemporary art. Author Melissa Miller writes, “[The exhibition] presents Riot Grrrls with one voice, with a ‘we’re all in this together’ attitude. In reality, the movement was troubled by the same internal debates that other generations of feminists have[…..]

Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, Ponte City, 2008-ongoing; installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Ian Reeves.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Larissa Archer‘s review of Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa, currently on view at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The review highlights the work of photographers Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, whose portraits, video projects, and zines reveal the lives of the residents living in a famous Brutalist building in Johannesburg. This article[…..]

#Hashtags: Proximity and Migration

Yamini Nayar. Head Over Heals, 2013. Lightjet print. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Erben Gallery, New York and Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai.

#institutions #representation #access #sustainability #visibility #regionalism #globalism Two shows at San Francisco museums this past July proposed to reconcile gaps between local and global concerns. For Proximities I: What Time Is It There? at the Asian Art Museum, guest curator Glen Helfand asked a group of Bay Area artists to consider the concept of Asia from the perspective of the culturally uninitiated. Migrating Identities, at Yerba[…..]