Amelia Rina

From this Author

William Larson: Fireflies at Gitterman Gallery

William Larson. Untitled, 1971; electro-carbon print; 11 x 8 ½ in. © William Larson. Courtesy Gitterman Gallery.

The constant stream of digital information traveling around us over wires and airways is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. Over the past two decades, many artists have begun exploring the seemingly limitless possibilities of digital communication. However, long before the integration of once-mysterious electronic media into the art world in the 1990s, William Larson used a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter to produce some of the[…..]

Street View / Road to Mecha by Jonathan Zawada, and Drone directed by Tonje Hessen Schei

Jonathan Zawada, Street View / Road to Mecha, 2013; screen shot, Brooklyn, NY. Photo: Amelia Rina

O bitter is the knowledge that one draws from the voyage! The monotonous and tiny world, today, Yesterday, tomorrow, always, shows us our reflections, An oasis of horror in a desert of boredom! —Charles Baudelaire, Le Voyage (1861)[1] Despite the seemingly endless portrayal in the media of increased violence around the world, statistical analysis suggests that, as a species, humans have become less violent.[2] I wonder,[…..]

Amanda Turner Pohan: The Signals Are Caressing Us at A.I.R. Gallery

2.	Amanda Turner Pohan. The Signals Are Caressing Us, 2015; installation view, A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn. Courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

In the back room of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, a scent dispenser exhales once an hour. A meandering plastic tube connects the dispenser to a six-and-a-half-gallon jug on the floor near the center of the room. The jug contains the concentrated form of a custom-formulated perfume derived from sensors that measured the carbon dioxide exhaled by the artist Amanda Turner Pohan during thirteen unique orgasms.[…..]

The Hidden Passengers at apexart

Guido van der Werve. Nummer zeven (the clouds are more beautiful from above), 2006; video projection, 8:48 min (video still). Courtesy of apexart.

Before the Enlightenment elevated empiricism and introduced the notion of “pseudoscience” as its foil, religion, magic, and science coexisted on a relatively level plane. Today, art remains one of few arenas that have been able to sidestep Enlightenment mandates; here, the exploration of ideas is not confined to the reproducibility of empirical data, allowing for a more unconstrained examination of the nature of things. The[…..]

Stay in Love at Lisa Cooley and Laurel Gitlen

Love is a kind of obsession, and obsession is a kind of love. It is this sentiment, not one of sensationalism or romanticism, that permeates the works in the two-gallery group exhibition, Stay in Love, curated by Chris Sharp at Lisa Cooley and Laurel Gitlen. Alternating between meditative, neurotic, and celebratory, the featured artists investigate the subjects of their fascination with the thoroughness that exists[…..]

Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet at The Cloisters

Getting to the Janet Cardiff installation at The Cloisters was like a modern-day quest for some kind of Holy Grail, which in the end seemed appropriate. After my phone died at the 191st St. subway stop—leaving me with no guide through the unfamiliar paths of Fort Tryon Park—and after circling the labyrinthine rooms and hallways that make up The Cloister’s architecture, I finally found The Forty[…..]

Supertheory of Supereverything: Interview with Eric William Carroll

GUT FEELING Installation Photos-5 RE-EDIT

Like many in the scientific community, Eric William Carroll is searching for an ultimate theory of everything, but he’s doing so in a slightly different way. For G.U.T. Feeling, the current exhibition at Highlight Gallery, Carroll utilized aspects of the scientific method in combination with personal associations to create a series of collages, photographs, and sculptures that expose the unexpected, overlooked, and sometimes comically dubious connections in[…..]