Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

Fan Mail: Brian Cooper

Brian Cooper. Gratification Management, 2004 (detail); upholstery, synthetic stuffing, staples, zip ties, chicken wire, covered buttons, metal buckets, carpet, wood paneling; 15 x 30 x 2 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

There is something quite sordid about Brian Cooper’s sculptural installations. The tufted forms in sickly mustard yellows and dark browns seem to ooze over walls, drip down plinths, and pool on aging carpets. As heavy, spreading masses and playful renditions on the theme of corporeality, they are like tactile manifestations of the slow, creeping wave of nausea that comes when one has overstayed an afterparty.[…..]

Fan Mail: Fei Li

Fei Li. The Hidden Dimension and Other Observations, installation view, 2016; ink on paper, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Experiencing Fei Li’s landscapes is like walking into a jungle. Her tangled calligraphy leaps and coils across the paper like vines, folding in associations with visual language; the disparate sensations of walking through dense vegetation and reading a scrawled manuscript are flattened into one experience, such that the idea that the two were ever separate seems like an abstract theory. Li’s work suggests an almost[…..]

Fan Mail: Ludovic Duchâteau

Ludovic Duchâteau. Dynamic Confirmation, 2016 (installation view); plastic, epoxy, clay, latex, copper, steel, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ludovic Duchâteau’s work presents visions of ambivalent technologies, uncannily inert and uncertain in their impotence. His objects are often scattered and sprawled along gallery floors or empty streets as if discarded or depleted. Their forms resemble our technological objects and fantasies, and imagery from science fiction. They look almost like crashed alien probes or satellites, disconnected from their users or power sources, vaguely threatening in[…..]

Fan Mail: Kyle J. Bauer

Kyle J. Bauer. mooring, 2013; wood, steel cable, fiberglass, slip-cast porcelain, paint; 98 in. x 108 in. x 24 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

The sculptures of Kyle J. Bauer have a gamelike quality, a sense of earnest play rarely seen in work made with such formalist rigor. Drawing from maritime navigation and the idea of façade—both as the decorative facing of a building and as a superficial or false front—for primary inspiration, Bauer mixes bright colors and found materials to produce works that feel vaguely familiar, as if[…..]

Fan Mail: Marcus James

Marcus James. Bidean Nam Bian, 2015; colour pencil on Fabriano paper; 2000 x 1300 mm. Courtesy of the Artist.

In this time of rapid environmental decline, visual depictions of landscape can become sites for critical positioning. Marcus James’s 2015 works encapsulate the disjuncture between a desire for pristine, solitary experiences in nature and the technological interventions that reveal this desire as pure fantasy. But rather than present a crass comment on this contradiction, James’s pieces offer a possibility outside of the binary constructed between[…..]

Fan Mail: Rachel Wolfson Smith

Rachel Wolfson Smith. Bound to Earth, 2015; graphite on paper; 54 x 96 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Rachel Wolfson Smith’s pencil drawings of motorcycle and car crashes seem to memorialize modern epics. At once glorious and kitschy, these homages to what the artist calls “Renaissance battle paintings” capture moments of intense struggle, dialed up to eleven: they border on the farcical but maintain an undeniable gravitas. The monochromatic graphite tones and occasional gilt highlights situate the drawings in a context of glorified[…..]