Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Carlo Speranza

Carlo Speranza. Karlo's Unrealized Works, 2014; 24k gold-leaf on cardboard boxes; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

A kayak that goes only in circles, a disappearing art gallery, a film that begins and ends at the credit sequence, and a set of pure gold nails driven into a gallery wall are just some of Northern Italy-based artist Carlo Speranza’s deceptively clever projects. Speranza, as the previous list implies, works across an exceptionally broad range of mediums; his work is made using wood,[.....]

Fan Mail: Richard Stone

Richard Stone. After,2011; antique oil on board, surface partly removed, whitewashed, lime wood molding, water white miroguard AR glazing; 20 x 16 centimeters. Courtesy of the artist.

Richard Stone creates paintings, sculptures, and installations that form constellations of meaning. While the works are all distinct—for example, a series of bronze figurines half-covered in smooth, bulbous wax, or a carved white marble flag that ripples in an unseen wind—when exhibited together, they form a cohesive yet mysterious network. Stone is chiefly concerned with art and cultural history. He explores the past through the[.....]

Fan Mail: Laura Stevens

Laura Stevens. Sofia from the series Another November, 2014; archival giclée pigment print; 60 x 90 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Laura Stevens is a photographer whose work blends the elegance of the cinematic with the erudition of the documentary. She shoots her subjects—most often a number of single female figures—in series that detail an engaging range of emotional and psychological states. The action in these images takes place in similarly evocative and highly staged domestic settings: an antique and ornately wallpapered hotel room, a subject’s[.....]

Fan Mail: Lisa Wicka

Lisa Wicka. Construction of Self (detail), 2013; House paint, vintage wallpaper, laminate flooring, wood and chalk line; two interior spaces: 5 x 7 x 15 feet and 4 x 5 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.

At the heart of Lisa Wicka’s artwork is a set of keenly nuanced spatial and visual adaptations. Her work transforms motifs, compositions, and ideas—human figures, abstract shapes, and reinterpretations of physical and perceived spaces—into unified bodies. Her small canvases, combine-like sculptures, and large-scale installations all mark their spaces of display with striking gravity. Most arresting is Wicka’s ability to create compositions that profoundly alter visual[.....]

Fan Mail: Joe Penrod

Joe Penrod. Deflated (after 3 weeks), 2010; mylar balloons, painter’s tape; 4 x 3 feet. Courtesy of Half/Dozen Gallery.

Typically, the studio is where artists make their work, but Joe Penrod’s space for creative development exists anywhere a shadow falls. Armed with only a roll of cerulean painter’s tape, Penrod transforms once-mundane shadows (and the objects that cast them) into fecund sculptural compositions. There are a few stages in Penrod’s process. First he finds an object that casts a particularly beautiful or striking shadow.[.....]

Fan Mail: Matt Shallenberger

Matt Shallenberger. 2735 from the series False Pond, 2014; archival pigment print; 32 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Matt Shallenberger approaches his photographic subjects—most often landscapes—as a cartographer approaches a new territory. As he discovers information by following the sight lines of mountains, rivers, boundaries, horizons, and the ever-changing position of the sun or the moon, he always takes into account the history and prior records of his subjects. While he works consistently with darkened, blissfully moody vistas, Shallenberger’s research into his subjects[.....]

Fan Mail: Kristine Schomaker

Kristine Schomaker. History of composition and red, 2014; acrylic on board; 48 x 24 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Digital and analog technologies are seemingly at odds, with the digital on the verge of subsuming and overtaking the analog. The work of artist Kristine Schomaker, however, attempts in strikingly direct fashion to bridge the increasingly complex space between these two poles while acknowledging a deep-seated fascination with both. Schomaker uses digital graphics and animations to make objects, images, and avatars. These works stand as[.....]