Posts Tagged ‘Fan Mail’

Fan Mail: Sarah Beth Woods

Sarah Beth Woods. A Big Diamond, 2016; hair weave, foam, door-knocker earrings; 67 x 7 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

True to its name, the BRAID/WORK series by Sarah Beth Woods operates within layers of social and material meaning, revealing a deconstructionist character even as it replicates the physical act of weaving. In the creation of these pieces, Woods pulls apart the concepts that make them legible. BRAID/WORK includes a 2016 performance and collaboration between Woods and the Malian-American professional hair braider, teacher, and entrepreneur[…..]

Fan Mail: Matt Lee

Matt Lee. Untitled, from Presence of Absence, 2011; archival inkjet print, 14.2 x 21.3 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

There is a certain playful unknowability to Matt Lee’s work. As preoccupied with structure as its inverse, Lee’s pieces suggest an interaction with the intangible that is at once wholly serious and strangely lighthearted. Confronted by subjects like death, absence, and emptiness, a viewer might expect an oeuvre weighted down by existential dread, but in Lee’s work, these subjects become lively participants in conversation with[…..]

Fan Mail: Suchitra Mattai

Suchitra Mattai. Generally, I don’t think that way II, 2016; mixed media installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Wes Magyar.

Suchitra Mattai’s work turns about conceptual and material inversions. It thrives on site-specificity while rejecting its basic premise—that specificity necessarily connotes place-ness. Having been raised on two separate continents and with cultural heritages tracing back to a third, Mattai is familiar with incongruities between the illusory promise of place and her lived experiences. Her practice is disjointed and dreamlike, yet throughout her uneasy landscapes runs[…..]

Fan Mail: Gala Knörr

Gala Knörr. Threesome, 2015; phototransfer and oil on linen; 7.8 x 13.7 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For Gala Knörr, the world of social media is a labyrinth of communication that never ceases to pique her curiosity. She finds inspiration in connecting with random strangers on Snapchat, an increasingly popular app that enables users to share photos, videos, or conversations through private and public messaging without leaving a permanent record. With its informality and speed of sharing, Snapchat has become a hotbed[…..]

Fan Mail: Alexander Heffesse

Alexander Heffesse. Sanitary Wipe (Large), 2016; solid surface, epoxy, paper towel, nylon strap, stand; 12 x 5 x 11 in. Photo by Adele Schelling.

With a background in architecture, it’s no surprise that Brooklyn-based artist Alexander Heffesse works so well with space. Heffesse engages with installation as a construction site, his point of departure being the idea of the construction worker as an artisan figure engaged in the act of creating. Noticing the proliferation of empty Gatorade bottles at construction sites, Heffesse drew a connection between social economics and[…..]

Fan Mail: Rachel Granofsky

Rachel Granofsky. Ghost Sex, 2014; pigment print; 42 x 56 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Rachel Granofsky’s approach to photography is akin to puzzle making, a balancing act between meticulously connecting individual parts while holding an unwavering attention to the whole. She creates her photographs at her Bushwick studio, which is set up as a miniature stage for building life-size installations. Granofsky constructs, frames, and captures; this labor-intensive process is her way of subverting the immediacy of digital photography. In[…..]

Fan Mail: Jason Kearney

Jason Kearney. Untoward, 2015; digital collage; 9.8 x 11.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jason Kearney’s collage Untoward (2015) juxtaposes one figure against another, creating an ambiguous relationship. A man sitting at the wheel of a car gazes through the windshield at a man on a fainting couch. The man at the wheel has a perplexed look on his face (viewers can see him reflected in the rear-view mirror)—or maybe he is simply squinting from the sunlight. Untoward is[…..]