Painting

Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum

Keith Haring. A Pile of Crowns for Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1988; acrylic on canvas; 120 x 120 x 120 in. Courtesy of de Young Museum San Francisco. Collection of the Keith Haring Foundation. © 2014, Keith Haring Foundation.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Kara Q. Smith’s review of Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Smith notes that the exhibition “…offers the chance not only to appreciate the artist’s work and iconic imagery from multiple perspectives (albeit sometimes dizzying at this scale), but most importantly the chance to bring new context to the work.”[…..]

Art & Language: Nobody Spoke at Lisson Gallery

Art & Language. Installation shot of Drawings From the Winter. 2012-2013. Ink on paper. 41.2 x 29.7 cm each.

Retrospectives are tricky things—despite the often incomplete, reductive, and forced nature of the form, it is the curatorial genre put into action the most, and the one that most easily conforms to the logic of the museum and the market through its presentation of the individual artist’s career as linear and progressive. Audiences love them, art historians and critics love to complain about them, and[…..]

David Ryan at MCQ Fine Art

David Ryan. (Untitled), 2014; Sintra construction with hand painting; 8 3⁄4 x 16 1⁄2 x 1⁄4 in.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Dawn-Michelle Baude reviews David Ryan’s current solo show at MCQ Fine Art in Las Vegas. David Ryan’s first solo exhibition in Las Vegas pushes into fresh terrain.[…..]

Fan Mail: Dene Leigh

Dene Leigh. Identify (someone or something) from having encountered before, 2014; oil on linen; 51 x 62 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Dene Leigh paints, constructs, combines, and assembles his work using traditional and old-master techniques to confront the neurological conditions of human memory. With a mixture of found and trompe l’oeil representations of objects, Leigh creates works that push the boundaries of collage, painting, assemblage, and installation. Many of Leigh’s works deal specifically with the neuropsychological disorder called agnosia, which struck Leigh’s grandfather late in life[…..]

Landscape City at Center for the Arts Eagle Rock

Jennifer Juniper Stratford. Still from Program Vista, 2014, video projection. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo by the author.

A crowd gathered under the rafters and art-deco chandeliers of the Eagle Rock Center for the Arts, and the fifteen-piece Aaron Olson Ensemble began with the low strum of a bass guitar, continued into a bright piano melody that later became the distorted sound of a nightmare, and finally moved into a powerful brassy conclusion without ever losing its warm aural undercurrents. Aaron M. Olson’s[…..]

Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Charles the First, 1982; acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas; three panels, 78 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an assessment of Jordana Moore Saggese’s new monograph, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Of Basquiat’s work, reviewer Anton Stuebner notes: “[the] canvases require viewers to […] recognize that the boundaries of pictorial representation, like language, can be redefined and reformed.” This article was originally published on October 7, 2014. The mythology around Jean-Michel Basquiat continues to proliferate in[…..]

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Mary and Leigh Block Museum

Wangechi Mutu. Suspended Playtime, 2008/2013; Packing blankets, twine, garbage bags, and gold string; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

This year has been unusually promising for the visibility of work by black female artists, even while that prominence has further highlighted racially problematic attitudes within the art world. The last ten months have marked the first in which an African American woman—Carrie Mae Weems—was given a retrospective at the Guggenheim, though her triumphant entry into that pantheon led to rebukes that the museum cut the original[…..]