Painting

Summer Session – Sofia Leiby: The Drama of Leisure at Devening Projects

Sophia Leiby. Untitled, 2013; mixed media on canvas, 22 x 18 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Devening Projects + Editions, Chicago.

For the first part of our Summer Session, we’re thinking about labor, and today we’re also considering its opposite—leisure. Steve Ruiz’s review of Sofia Leiby’s most recent show at Devening Projects + Editions considers the artist’s time: “With so much else in an artist’s life productively structured, purposefully performed, and in general feeling like work, what could be more radical than insisting that the center of an[…..]

Young Blood: Noah Davis, Kahlil Joseph, the Underground Museum at Frye Art Museum

Noah Davis and Kahlil Joseph. The Sacred Garden, 2016; installation view. Design and production: Commonwealth Projects. Photo: Mark Woods.

Currently on view at Frye Art Museum, Young Blood is a large-scale exhibition of two prominent contemporary artists and brothers, painter Noah Davis and filmmaker Kahlil Joseph. The most elaborate display of their individual works to date, Young Blood includes painting, film, sculpture, and installation, weaving varied mediums together with precision and fluidity. Through the tone and cadence of their depicted world—one of beauty, mystery,[…..]

Fan Mail: Gala Knörr

Gala Knörr. Threesome, 2015; phototransfer and oil on linen; 7.8 x 13.7 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For Gala Knörr, the world of social media is a labyrinth of communication that never ceases to pique her curiosity. She finds inspiration in connecting with random strangers on Snapchat, an increasingly popular app that enables users to share photos, videos, or conversations through private and public messaging without leaving a permanent record. With its informality and speed of sharing, Snapchat has become a hotbed[…..]

Albert Yowshien Kuo: Gonna Be Alright at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary

Albert Yowshien Kuo. Still Boxing, 2016; Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas; 70 x 66 in. Courtesy of Albert Yowshien Kuo. Photo: Albert Yowshien Kuo.

Albert Yowshein Kuo’s solo exhibition, Gonna Be Alright, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary features three large paintings. In them, he depicts figurative tableaux that obliquely reflect social values such as race and gender. The paintings are familiar and unfamiliar, timeless and contemporary. To simply say that Kuo’s juxtapositions of figures and scenes is surreal would be too easy a summation. While painted in a traditional style[…..]

Interview with Katherine Bradford

Katherine Bradford. Water Nurses, 2016; acrylic on canvas. Courtesy the artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Christine Taylor

Artist Katherine Bradford likes acrylic paint. As a material, acrylic is filled with wonder for its contradictions. Its water-soluble chemistry allows for the kind of dreamy washes that color fields and abstractions often rely on, while its water-resistant setting state is anchored and dependable. Bradford’s solo exhibition Divers and Dreamers, currently on view at Adams and Ollman, is up to the comparison of being dually[…..]

F.T.P: For the People at Galería de la Raza

Fanny Aishaa. Elsipogtog, 2003; print based on original oil painting; 36 x 48 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Galería de la Raza, San Francisco. Photo: Henry Pacheco.

 Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Ángel Rafael Vázquez-Concepción reviews F.T.P: For the People at Galería de la Raza in San Francisco.   At Galería de la Raza in the Mission District[…..]

Robert Irwin: All the Rules Will Change at the Hirshhorn Museum

Robert Irwin. Bed of Roses, 1962; ©2016 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Robert Irwin has had a number of distinct careers as an artist, each with a distinct group of peers and beliefs. All the Rules Will Change presents the best known but least seen of these careers: the studio painter of the 1960s, who began the decade as a conventional Abstract Expressionist, and ended it by closing his studio and abandoning a practice of painting that[…..]