Fan Mail: Eric G. C. Weets

Eric G. C. Weets. The Eric G. C. Weets. Looking Around, 2013; oil on canvas; 31.1 x 31.1 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For Eric G. C. Weets, size does matter. Since 2007 he has been creating sprawling canvases of intertwined line drawings in his studio in Pune, India, where the Belgian artist has lived for the past twenty-three years. In searching for a means to document human experience through form, Weets discovered in scale a conceptual and practical mechanism that served his desire for an expansive, albeit[…..]

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

How Iraqi Are You?

Hayv Kahraman. Curfew, 2015; Oil on linen. Courtesy the Artist and The Third Line.

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you a piece on the art of Iraqi-born artist Hayv Kahraman. Author Natasha Morris sat down with Kahraman at the Frieze Art Fair to talk about her research-based practice. Morris says “To attempt to read the dialogue between text and images in How Iraqi Are You? entails similar cognitive acrobatics, as tableaus of beautiful women hover over jokes about[…..]

Manjunath Kamath: As Far As I Know at the SCAD Museum of Art

Manjunath Kamath. As Far As I Know, 2015; installation view, Savanna College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the SCAD Museum of Art.

The humorous pathos in the work is readily apparent, from the rabbits’ curiosity exposing them to deadly exhaust to a car dying and ascending to heaven.

From the Archives– Evan Gruzis: Shell Game at The Suburban

Evan Gruzis. Free Box, 2014; Textile dye and acrylic on canvas; 48 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from the archives we bring you Steve Ruiz’s review of Evan Gruzis’s Shell Game at the Suburban, Michelle Grabner and husband Brad Killam’s backyard gallery in Oak Park that pioneered the suburb’s role as a hub of Chicago alternative art spaces. Grabner’s gingham soccer ball, currently Issue 27 of THE THING Quarterly, offers up a playful rejoinder to Ken Johnson’s famous criticism of Grabner’s work as “soccer mom” art. The second[…..]

Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Guerilla Girls. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist from Guerilla Girls, Most Wanted, 1985–2006, 1988; lithograph printed in black on paper, 17 x 22-1/8 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the gift of the Fred Bergfors and Margaret Sandberg Foundation.

The exhibition Women’s Work is constructed within a historical frame. All of the included artists are introduced as individuals prominent in second-wave feminism, defined as a past era from the 1960s through the 1980s, a period with a beginning and an end. It cannot be denied that a great deal has changed in both feminist thought and social mores since then. Third-wave feminism called out[…..]

Enrique Martínez Celaya – Empires: Land and Sea at Jack Shainman Gallery

1.	Enrique Martinez Celaya. The Bloom, for the Wilderness, 2015; oil and wax on canvas; 74-3/4 x 101-3/4 x 2-1/2 in (framed). Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

“It’s not a key,” Enrique Martínez Celaya warns of the text Empires: The Writing, which accompanies his first solo exhibition at Jack Shainman, now on view at the gallery’s two venues in Chelsea under the titles Empires: Land and Empires: Sea.[1] I meet Celaya in early September, when we walk through the shows on the eve of the artist’s departure for his home in Los Angeles. Empires[…..]