Photography

Summer Reading – Nothing That Meets the Eye: Notes on Clones

Hal Fischer. Street Fashion Basic Gay from the series Gay Semiotics, 1977/2014; Carbon pigment print, 20 x 16 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3.

Today we kick off our annual Summer Reading series, in which our writers and editors select their favorite recent articles on contemporary art from around the web. First up is an excerpt from Matt Sussman’s “Nothing That Meets the Eye: Notes on Clones,” originally published on SFMOMA’s Open Space on June 3, 2015. In this essay, Sussman considers the culture of reproduction and copies within the[…..]

Three Katrinas

Isabelle Hayeur. Etang 04, 2013; Archival pigment print; 36 x 36 in. Image courtesy of the Artist.

“Memorials are the way people make promises to the future about the past.” Alice Greenwald, director of the National 9/11 Memorial Museum, reminds us that a memorial is as much how we describe who we are now as it is about a prior event. The 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina provides an opportunity to look back at a particular moment of disaster, injustice, upheaval, and[…..]

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery

Bryson Rand, Mario & Danny (Los Angeles), 2015; Pigment print, edition of 5, 42 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Petra Bibeau’s review of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “[the exhibition]succeeds due to the selected artists’ compulsive desire to create their own narration from a point of obsession with being rather than from a literal rendition of living.” This article was originally published on August 12, 2015. In[…..]

Barbara Kasten: Stages at ICA Philadelphia

(from left to right) Barbara Kasten. Studio Construct 125, 2011; archival pigment print; 53 3/4 x 43 3/4 in.; Studio Construct 32, 1986; Silver dye bleach print; 37 x 29 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania.

At the entrance to Barbara Kasten: Stages at the Philadelphia Institute of Contemporary Art, there is a corner-placed grouping of five photographs. Four early Polaroids made in 1982 and 1983 are on the right; with their geometric shapes and pastel colors, they would fit easily into the reigning design aesthetic of the 1980s. On the left is the 2007 silver-dye bleach print Studio Construct 17,[…..]

After Utopia at the Singapore Art Museum

Shen Shaomin. Summit (detail) silica gel simulation, acrylic and fabric, dimensions variable, Singapore Art Museum collection, image courtesy Singapore Art Museum

After Utopia: Revisiting the Ideal in Asian Contemporary Art at the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) explores the dissonance between our innermost longings and the contemporary world we have created. Gunter Grass said, rather gloomily, that melancholy and utopia are heads and tails of the same coin. Imagining perfection, we confront the contradiction between the Arcadia of our imagination and the imperfect realities of our everyday. Featuring eighteen[…..]

Fan Mail: John Tierney

John Tierney. Elvis is on the Building, Palm Springs, 2013; oil on canvas; 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

John Tierney’s paintings have a distinct relationship to cinema. Hollywood, California, and the greater Los Angeles area are awash in a rich and intense light that seems to linger over everything with an endless glow, a light as potent as the dreams and realities of fame and stardom promised by the movie companies that populate the city. For a representational painter such as Tierney, the[…..]

Ten Years Gone at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Willie Birch. Crawfish Dwelling. 2009. Bronze. 6 x 5.5 x 4 inches. Image courtesy of Willie Birch and the Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans, LA.

In the aftermath of a catastrophe, memorialization and remembrance are inevitably tied to forms of forgetting. These often take the shape of reactionary modes that proclaim an urgent desire to smooth over the eruptive, unresolved conflicts that shape our collective past and place them into digestible modes of representation.[1] However, for the communities that bear witness to the impact of a disastrous event, forgetting is[…..]