Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery

Jay DeFeo, Untitled, 1973; gelatin silver print, 7 3/4 x 9 9/16 in., Estate no. P0778A. May not be reproduced in any form without permission of The Jay DeFeo Trust, © 2015 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Author Anton Stuebner notes, “In reconceptualizing the forms of her everyday life, DeFeo’s work suggests the importance of embracing the imaginary and the real as necessary complements.” This article was originally published on October 1, 2015. Shadows suffuse Jay DeFeo’s work. In her gelatin silver prints,[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to tow the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Chris Fraser: Animated at Gallery Wendi Norris

Chris Fraser. Mobile | 0˚, 90˚, 90˚ | Argon and Neon, 2015; powder-coated steel, gas discharge tubes, transformer, argon, and neon; 42 x 21 x 12 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

In addition to their current special issue on the legacy of punk rock, our partners at Art Practical are also blasting into the new season with their annual Shotgun series—ten short reviews by regular contributors that cover the Bay Area art scene. This review, by Danica Willard Sachs, investigates the works of artist Chris Fraser, currently on view at Gallery Wendi Norris. This article was originally published on September[…..]

Fan Mail: Tavis Lochhead

Tavis Lochhead. Habitat 10, 2015; digital image. Courtesy of Tavis Lochhead.

Toronto-based artist Tavis Lochhead has a knack for the surreal. In his photo collage series Habitat, large sections of industrial sites are digitally manipulated into semi-abstract compositions that disrupt the mundane aesthetics of manufacturing zones. In each work, the central figure—what the artist describes as “a sculptural element floating in space”—is an assemblage produced by an elaborate process of merging, mirroring, and stitching. Initially trained in[…..]

Summer Reading – Nothing That Meets the Eye: Notes on Clones

Hal Fischer. Street Fashion Basic Gay from the series Gay Semiotics, 1977/2014; Carbon pigment print, 20 x 16 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3.

Today we kick off our annual Summer Reading series, in which our writers and editors select their favorite recent articles on contemporary art from around the web. First up is an excerpt from Matt Sussman’s “Nothing That Meets the Eye: Notes on Clones,” originally published on SFMOMA’s Open Space on June 3, 2015. In this essay, Sussman considers the culture of reproduction and copies within the[…..]

Three Katrinas

Isabelle Hayeur. Etang 04, 2013; Archival pigment print; 36 x 36 in. Image courtesy of the Artist.

“Memorials are the way people make promises to the future about the past.” Alice Greenwald, director of the National 9/11 Memorial Museum, reminds us that a memorial is as much how we describe who we are now as it is about a prior event. The 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina provides an opportunity to look back at a particular moment of disaster, injustice, upheaval, and[…..]

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery

Bryson Rand, Mario & Danny (Los Angeles), 2015; Pigment print, edition of 5, 42 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Petra Bibeau’s review of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “[the exhibition]succeeds due to the selected artists’ compulsive desire to create their own narration from a point of obsession with being rather than from a literal rendition of living.” This article was originally published on August 12, 2015. In[…..]