Sound Art

The St. Petersburg Paradox at Swiss Institute

The St. Petersburg Paradox, installation view, Swiss Institute. (from left to right) Sarah Ortmeyer. SANKT PETERSBURG PARADOX, 2014: marble chessboards, copper, iron, brass and aluminum chess tables, natural (ostrich, rhea, goose, chicken, mallard, quail, emu, and duck) eggs, artificial (marble obsidian, alabaster, and onyx) eggs; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv. Tabor Robak. A*, 2014; 14-channel HD video; 9:46 min. Courtesy of the artist and team (gallery, inc.). John Miller. Labyrinth I, 1999; acrylic on canvas with sound component; 54 x 70 in. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. Kaspar Müller. Tropic of Cancer, 2014; laser prints on A3 paper; each 12 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy Galerie Francesca Pia, Zürich, The Green Gallery, Milwaukee, and Federico Vavassori, Milan. Cayetano Ferrer. Remnant Recomposition, 2014; carpet remnants, seam tape; 18 x 60 ft. Courtesy of the artist.

The St. Petersburg Paradox, currently on view at Swiss Institute, is a group show of refreshing intellectual rigor. The exhibition’s curatorial design is so tightly wound that it forms a kind of singular entity in which each featured artwork compels the viewer to consider the philosophy of its larger scheme: namely, the metaphysics of gambling. The title refers to a paradox of human psychology: When[…..]

Kamau Patton: The Sky Above

Today from our friends at Machine Project in Los Angeles, we bring you a video excerpt of artist Kamau Patton’s project The Sky Above, part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. While flying above L.A. in a chartered helicopter, Patton performed a responsive sound piece; the visual and sonic experiences were streamed live to Machine Project’s storefront space and the web. The project was originally[…..]

Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I at the New Museum

Ragnar Kjartansson. Take Me Here by the Dishwasher (Memorial for a Marraige), 2011. Installation view, Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I, 2014. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Ragnar Kjartansson’s Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage, a mixture of live performance and film, transforms the New Museum’s fourth floor into something like a college movie night sent adrift. The darkened gallery, one wall of which serves as projector screen, becomes a makeshift den—modestly furnished but amply stocked with beer—for ten shaggy troubadours with acoustic guitars. Their ambling, unbroken melody[…..]

Interview with Josh Short

Josh Short. Going to Church, 2014; installation view, The Warehouse, Salina Art Center. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: April Engstrom.

I’ve recently been introduced to the term prairie madness. It’s fictional—not founded in medicine—but it captured my imagination all the same. Artist Josh Short laughed as he explained it to me: The gist is that one can be driven to psychosis by the far-flung expansiveness of the Midwest. Characters in novels have been driven to tears by the isolation, the seemingly never-ending wind, and their[…..]

Nobuo Kubota: Sonic Scores at YYZ Artists Outlet

Schwoop. Bap. Tschk-tschk. Dom. Dung. No, the start to this review isn’t full of typos; it’s my attempt at onomatopoeia to capture the sounds that greet viewers at Nobuo Kubota’s YYZ exhibit Sonic Scores. Kubota is a Canadian multimedia artist who often uses sound in his work. His practice is inspired by an interest in jazz and Zen Buddhism, and Sonic Scores presents elements attributed[…..]

If the World Changed: Singapore Biennale 2013

Teamlab. Peace Can Be Realized Even Without Order, 2012; interactive digital installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Singapore Art Museum.

Premised on the obliquely hypothetical question “What if the world changed?”, the Singapore Biennale 2013 (SB2013) is presented as a deconstructed entity centered on allusive keywords—or “tags” in internetspeak—such as “histories,” “intervention,” and “materiality” in order to highlight the transmutative and the transformative qualities of the art produced in the region. With a collaborative team of 27 curators instead of an artistic director helming the show,[…..]

Richard T. Walker at Kadist San Francisco

Today we bring you a video excerpt of Richard T. Walker‘s recent performance the security of impossibility, part of the Summer Music Series at Kadist San Francisco. Originally performed on July 10, 2013, the security is composed of layered harmonies, live and recorded music, multiple projections, and participant-operated tape players.